Ebola

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Ebola

(ĭ-bō′lə, ĕb′ō-lä)
n.
1. A filovirus that causes disease in humans and nonhuman primates and spreads through contact with bodily fluids of infected people and animals. Bats are thought to be the host reservoir for the virus. Also called Ebola virus.
2. An acute, usually fatal form of hemorrhagic fever that is caused by this virus and is characterized by fever, headache, muscle pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and bleeding, especially from the mucous membranes and gastrointestinal tract. Also called Ebola disease, Ebola hemorrhagic fever, Ebola virus disease.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Ebola,

river in Zaire, Africa.
Ebola hemorrhagic fever - Synonym(s): Ebola virus
Ebola virus - filovirus discovered in 1976, level 4 pathogen; severity of illness can run from mild to fatal in host. Synonym(s): Ebola hemorrhagic fever
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ebola Sudan vaccine has been evaluated in three Phase I trials in Africa and the United States as a bivalent formulation with Ebola Zaire and will be evaluated in an upcoming Phase I study as monovalent formulation.
Ebola Zaire, Ebola Sudan and Marburg are members of the Filoviridae virus family and are commonly referred to as filoviruses.
Lists were developed for the Filoviridae in general, as well as tbr Marburg virus only; again, at the crude geographic scale of this review, owing to rough distributional coincidence between Ebola Sudan and Marburg virus outbreaks, Ebola virus distributions are more or less coincident with those of the entire family, and so the two are considered together at this point.
Eliminating Ebola Sudan, however, yielded a prediction completely excluding the distribution of Ebola Sudan (Figure 2C), which suggests that Ebola Sudan occurs under a distinct ecologic regime.
Ebola Sudan is genetically and ecologically most distinct among Ebola virus species, and (with Ebola Reston) forms the sister clade to Ebola Ivory Coast + Ebola Zaire.
Given the phylogenyecology correspondence documented above, the ecology of Ebola Sudan may prove key in predicting the distribution of Ebola Reston, but the scanty occurrence data make species-specific models difficult.