satellite

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satellite

 [sat´ĕ-līt]
1. in genetics, a knob of chromatin connected by a stalk to the short arm of certain chromosomes.
2. a minor, or attendant, lesion situated near a large one.
3. a vein that closely accompanies an artery.
4. exhibiting satellitism.
5. satellite clinic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sat·el·lite

(sat'ĕ-līt),
1. A minor structure accompanying a more important or larger one; for example, a vein accompanying an artery, or a small or secondary lesion adjacent to a larger one.
See also: primite.
2. The posterior member of a pair of gregarine gamonts in syzygy, several of which may be found in some species.
See also: primite.
[L. satelles (sattelit-), attendant]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

satellite

(săt′l-īt′)
n.
1. Genetics A short segment of a chromosome separated from the rest by a constriction, typically associated with the formation of a nucleolus.
2. Microbiology A colony of microorganisms whose growth in culture medium is enhanced by certain substances produced by another colony in its proximity.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Referring to one or more lesions, masses, patterns or radiologic densities that surround a central point and have the same pathogenesis and appearance
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

satellite

adjective Referring to lesions, masses, patterns or radiologic densities that surround a central point. See Minisatellite.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sat·el·lite

(sat'ĕ-līt)
1. A minor structure accompanying a more important or larger one, e.g., a vein accompanying an artery, or a small or secondary lesion adjacent to a larger one.
2. The posterior member of a pair of gregarine gamonts in syzygy, several of which may be found in some species.
[L. satelles (sattelit-), attendant]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Hagihara, "Libration of an earth satellite with critical inclination," Smithsonian Contribution Astrophysics, vol.
A Defense Department press release announced that the Army was "to proceed with launching an earth satellite using a modified Jupiter C." This was clear evidence that the military possessed the means to launch a satellite well before the Soviets.
Earth satellite, Explorer I, was launched at 10:48 P.M.
The dates based on recognition of two important events in space history: the launch of the first human-made Earth satellite on October 4, 1957; and the signing of the Outer Space Treaty on October 10, 1967.
The dates based on recognition of two important events in space history: the launch of the first human-made Earth satellite on October 04, 1957; and the signing of the Outer Space Treaty on October 10, 1967.
WSW commemorates two events: The launching on October 4, 1957, of the first human-made Earth satellite, Sputnik 1, marking the beginning of the space race and of mankind's endeavor to explore space; and the signing on October 10, 1967, of the Outer Space Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, to form the basis of international space law.
Wednesday, 2 October 1957--"After dinner I went to the first meeting of the Artificial Earth Satellite Group "Moonwatch" at the Union Observatory.
London, August 11 ( ANI ): Google Earth satellite imagery survey may have revealed two possible pyramid complexes in Egypt.
The Boneyard - a vast recycling centre for military planes in the Arizona desert - has been captured in stunning high-resolution detail for the first time on this Google Earth satellite photo.
NASA's Earth satellite observing systems will continue to help the U.S.
The first earth satellite was put into orbit October 4, 1957, by the Soviet Union.

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