RENAISSANCE

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RENAISSANCE

Rheumatology A clinical trial–Tandomized Enbrel®/etanercept North American Strategy to Study Antagonism of Cytokines. See Etanercept.
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The author elucidates how university students during the late medieval and early Renaissance struggled with illiteracy (126).
Howard's theory that magnificence was established as a Florentine tradition in the early Renaissance is persuasive, especially as he points out antecedents in fourteenth-century Dominican preaching on urban renewal projects and the common good, which is again public theology.
Clearly, the audience for these lectures was extremely familiar with the art and culture of the early Renaissance. In each of these talks, Dempsey makes repeated reference to the work of other scholars without clearly identifying them and he uses many Italian terms without translating them.
The Early Renaissance and Vernacular Culture investigates the dynamic relationship between Italian vernacular culture and the classical humanist vocabulary of Renaissance art.
The fact that people in early Renaissance Italy were grappling with these issues is a humbling reminder of this.
Furthermore, Alexander Deroko, the most prominent Serbian historian of architecture, argued that the late medieval Serbian Morava style could be compared to the early Renaissance in the West.
Commentators and critics have long noted connections between various strains of art music in the twentieth century and the music of the medieval and early Renaissance periods.
It is described as an exceptional example of a late 16th century country gentry house in the early Renaissance style.
It represented the highest achievements in art reached at the time, during the early Renaissance," he added.
gives an account of the development of European and European-related arts (visual, literature, film, and music) from (1) within the Christian milieu (medieval into early Renaissance), through (2) the humanist (Renaissance through Modern), into (3) the death of art and resulting postmodern reorientations.
This is a small book that draws upon manuscript illuminations from the Middle Ages and early Renaissance. The text is organized into three sections: Animals in Daily Life (creating the animals, work and play, warfare, animals and the law, beasts in focus: the hunting manual); Symbolic Creatures (Christian symbols, astrological animals, heraldic creatures, beasts in focus; the besting); and Fantastic Beasts (marginal hybrids, mythological animals, dragons and demons, beasts in focus: the apocalypse).
Titus Burckhardt's history of Siena comes with his own color photos of the city and its countryside: some 28 color and 40 black and white reproductions of medieval and early Renaissance icons, paintings and sculptures capture the spiritual sentiments of its times and makes for a fine collection recommended for either art history or spiritual collections.

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