eardrum

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eardrum

 [ēr´drum]
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tym·pan·ic mem·brane

[TA]
a thin tense membrane forming the greater part of the lateral wall of the tympanic cavity and separating it from the external acoustic meatus; it constitutes the boundary between the external and middle ears; it is a trilaminar membrane covered with skin on its external surface, mucosa in its internal surface, is covered on both surfaces with epithelium, and, in the tense part, has an intermediate layer of outer radial and inner circular collagen fibers.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

eardrum

(îr′drŭm′)
n.
The thin, semitransparent, oval-shaped membrane that separates the middle ear from the external ear. Also called tympanic membrane, tympanum.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

eardrum

Tympanic membrane, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tym·pan·ic mem·brane

(tim-pan'ik mem'brān) [TA]
A thin, tense covering that forms the greater part of the lateral wall of the tympanic cavity and separates it from the external acoustic meatus; it constitutes the boundary between the external and middle ear, is covered on both surfaces with epithelium, and in the tense part has an intermediate layer of outer radial and inner circular collagen fibers.
Synonym(s): membrana tympani [TA] , drum membrane, drum, drumhead, eardrum, myringa, myrinx.
[L. membrana tympani]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

eardrum

The tympanic membrane that separates the inner end of the external auditory canal (the meatus) from the middle ear. The outer side of the drum is covered with thin skin and to the inner side is attached the malleus, first of the three tiny bones, the auditory ossicles.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

eardrum

see TYMPANIC MEMBRANE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Eardrum

A paper-thin covering stretching across the ear canal that separates the middle and outer ears.
Mentioned in: Hearing Aids
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

tym·pan·ic mem·brane

(tim-pan'ik mem'brān) [TA]
A thin tense membrane forming the greater part of the lateral wall of the tympanic cavity and separating it from the external acoustic meatus.
Synonym(s): eardrum.
[L. membrana tympani]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(5) In our study 49 (81.7%) patients had intact ear drum by third week without ear discharge and by the end of sixth week 53 (88.3%) had healed membrane with dry ear.
My ear drum might back us up a little but I'm still bringing you this new music.
The doctor, when he looks into your child's ear, sees though the external canal is fine, the ear drum looks swollen angry and red, he knows there is infection growing on the other side of the ear drum.
During air travel some passengers might experience earache due to pressure on the ear drum. This can be avoided if they continue to chew something during take off and descent of the flight.
With a hole in my ear drum there was a risk of serious injury if water were to enter the ear cups because the water pressure could force cold water through the hole into my middle ear and cause a dangerous condition known as vertigo.
* Ear candles have not been shown to be effective and can have adverse side effects, including burning or perforating the ear drum. Ear candling, often found in new age shops, involves putting a cone-shaped device--usually a fabric soaked in wax to harden--into the ear to remove impurities with smoke.
The gel absorbs the shock and protects the cheek and ear drum from vibration and trauma.
That causes your ear drum to vibrate, and you hear it.
Next the sound wave vibrates a thin membrane called the ear drum that in turn moves several tiny bones in the middle ear.
As such a small change in numbers results in a large change in pressure on the ear drum. An increase of 3dB is the same as doubling the pressure on the ear drum.
Fluid can collect behind the ear drum in the middle ear.
Sound waves are directed into the ear canal, where they bounce off the ear drum. Each frequency is translated into a recognizable sound in the sterile, pressurized inner ear and sent to the auditory nerve, which leads to the brain.