etic

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Related to ETICS: ETIX

etic

 [et´ik]
pertaining to expressions, perceptions, beliefs, and practices that are universal, or at least shared by several cultural groups; an etic view of a cultural system is one from the perspective of an outsider, based on universal and generalized explanations of behavior, rather than the perspective of the members of the system under study. See also emic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

etic

(e'tik)
In anthropology and transcultural nursing, related to a kind of analysis that relies on objective criteria; the description of an illness by an observer of a phenomenon rather than by someone experiencing that phenomenon.
See: emic
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
"Capatect ETICS system substantially reduces cooling costs by maintaining the temperature.
However, the degradation features of various structural layers in the ETICS GHB under hygrothermal cycle are of great importance; few of the existing studies, as we know, focused on these features.
The majority of research conducted in the field has been etic, while the cross-cultural data used by the researchers have been emic in nature.
Through research and development along with testing the technology Caparol Paints has been able to improve ETICS. The technology creates a more sustainable environment inside structures by trapping the heat outside while maintaining the cool temperatures inside, it added.
Results of single-trait analysis to estimate additive gen etic variance ( ) maternal additive genetic variance ( ) permanent environmental variance ( ) additive and maternal additive genetic covariance ( ) residual variance ( ) phenotypic variance ( ) direct heritability ( SE) maternal heritability ( SE) and correlation between direct and maternal additive genetic effects ( SE) for different traits are presented in Table 2.
The most common and accessible is the etic approach; the more difficult is the emic.