EMF


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force

 [fors]
energy or power; that which originates or arrests motion or other activity.
Forces resulting from a fall are transmitted up to the spine through the long leg bones and pelvis. From McQuillan et al., 2002.
electromotive force the force that, by reason of differences in potential, causes a flow of electricity from one place to another, giving rise to an electric current.
reserve force energy above that required for normal functioning. In the heart it is the power that will take care of the additional circulatory burden imposed by bodily exertion.
shearing f's see shear.
van der Waals f's the relatively weak, short-range forces of attraction existing between atoms and molecules, which results in the attraction of nonpolar organic compounds to each other (hydrophobic bonding).

EMF

Abbreviation for electromotive force.

EMF

Abbreviation for electromotive force.

field

(feld)
1. An open expanse of land.
2. A discipline or an area of study.
3. A region of space in which a given force operates or a given condition exists.
4. A place of natural conditions, as opposed to a controlled environment, such as a laboratory or a hospital.

auditory field

The spatial region in which a given person can hear sounds.

cortical field

A segment of the cerebral cortex that carries out a given function. For example, the front of the parietal lobe -- the postcentral gyrus -- can be called a primary somatosensory field, and the parietal cortex farther back can be called an association field.

dry field

A colloquial term for a bloodless surgical field in which the surgeon's vision is not obscured.

electric field

The region in space in which the attractive or repulsive effects of a given electric charge have an effect.

electromagnetic field

Abbreviation: EMF
The region in space in which the photons produced by moving electric charges have an effect. EMFs can be produced by power lines, radio waves, and microwaves. The energy produced in an EMF increases as the frequency of the photons increases, and EMFs produced by very high frequency photons (e.g., xrays and gamma rays) are sufficiently energetic to induce cancer.

eye field

Any region of the cortex concerned with sensation from or movement of an eye.

field of fixation

The widest limits of vision in all directions within which the eyes can fixate.

field of Forel

One the layers of axons -- many originating in the globus pallidus -- that form the lower (inferior) border of the thalamus in the brain. Together, the axons and neighboring neuronss are called the subthalamic reticular nucleus.
Synonym: Forel's field, prerubral field

free field

A space in which there are no surfaces that reflect specific frequencies of sound.

gradient-induced electric field

An electric field that may surround an object placed in a rapidly changing magnetic environment, such as one generated by a magnetic resonance imaging device.

gravitational field

The region in space in which the attractive effects of a given mass have an effect.

hand field

Any region of the cortex concerned with sensation from or movement of a hand.

heart field

The region of the embryo destined to produce the heart.

high-power field

The portion of an object seen when the high-magnification lenses of a microscope are used.

hippocampal field

Any of the three contiguous, but histologically distinguishable, sheets of cells that form the cortex of the hippocampus; the fields are usually called CA1, CA2, and CA3.

low-power field

The portion of an object seen when the low-magnification lenses of a microscope are used.

lung field

The region in the body containing a lung. Often, 'lung field' refers to the section of a medical image (e.g., chest xray) that shows a lung.

magnetic field

The space permeated by the magnetic lines of force surrounding a permanent magnet or coil of wire carrying electric current.

prerubral field

Field of Forel.

pulsing electromagnetic field

Abbreviation: PEMF
An alternating electrical current used to produce an electromagnetic field. This may induce healing when applied to a fractured bone. The field is applied noninvasively to the affected limb. It may be moderately helpful in treating bony nonunion. See: diathermy

receptive field

A description of the effective stimuli of a given neuron. For sensory receptor neurons, the receptive field is the type of effective stimulation (e.g., light, sound, mechanical pressure) and the range of sensitive locations (e.g., center of visual field, left auditory field, tip of right thumb).

sterile field

A body surface, along with surrounding drapes or towels, within which an operation may safely take place without introducing potentially hazardous microorganisms into a patient.

Patient care

The field is prepared by meticulously washing and scrubbing the patient on whom an operation will be performed with disinfectant solution. Sterile drapes and towels are placed over the patient to cover any unprepared skin or clothing with sterilized fabric. All surgical instruments that enter the operative theatre are cleansed according to decontamination and sterilization practices. Finally, all surgical personnel scrub for prescribed time periods with disinfectants before entering the operating room. They must wear sterile gloves, gowns, masks and shoe covers and replace these if any of them contact nonprepared items during surgery.

surgical field

The area in which an operation is performed. This field is prepared and covered to maintain sterility during operations.

useful field of view

Abbreviation: UFOV
A test of visual attention that measures the space in which an individual can receive information rapidly from two separate sources. It is a strong predictor of accidents in older drivers. Training can expand the useful field of view and increase the visual processing speed of an elderly person.

field of vision

Visual field.
Enlarge picture
VISUAL FIELD

visual field

The area within which objects may be seen when the eye is fixed.
Synonym: field of vision See: illustration; perimetry

electromagnetic field

Abbreviation: EMF
The region in space in which the photons produced by moving electric charges have an effect. EMFs can be produced by power lines, radio waves, and microwaves. The energy produced in an EMF increases as the frequency of the photons increases, and EMFs produced by very high frequency photons (e.g., xrays and gamma rays) are sufficiently energetic to induce cancer.
See also: field

force

(fors) [Fr. force, fr L. fortia]
A push or pull exerted on an object, changing its speed or direction. The metric unit for force is the newton, which equals 0.225 lb of force.

catabolic force

Energy produced by metabolism of food.

centrifugal force

The force that impels a thing, or parts of it, outward from the center of rotation.
See: centrifuge

electromotive force

Abbreviation: EMF
Energy that causes flow of electricity in a conductor. The energy is measured in volts.

G force

The gravitational constant. In aerospace medicine, the term indicates the forces acting on the human body during acceleration in certain flight maneuvers. Thus a force of 2 positive G means that the aviator is being subjected to a force twice that of gravity with a doubling of weight in that condition, i.e., the force against the seat is 2 G. G force may be in any axis and may be negative or positive.

maximum inspiratory force

Abbreviation: MIF
The output of the inspiratory muscles measured in negative centimeters of water pressure. It is measured by having the subject inhale from a tube connected to a manometer under conditions of no flow. Synonym: maximum inspiratory pressure; negative inspiratory force

negative inspiratory force

Maximum inspiratory force.

psychic force

Force generated apart from physical energy.

reserve force

The energy available above that required for normal functioning of the heart.

electromotive force

Abbreviation: EMF
Energy that causes flow of electricity in a conductor. The energy is measured in volts.
See also: force

EMF

Abbreviation for electromotive force.
References in periodicals archive ?
The heart is very sensitive to EMFs, particularly the pacemaker cells which have the highest density of VGCCs.
As valuation experts, we are not epidemiologists or public health experts, so we do not take any position as to the health impacts of EMFs. Of course, the public perception of health risks is independent of the scientific consensus.
Effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) on biological systems have been studied fairly extensively.
In order to investigate if 2mT is the minimum intensity value of the EMF wave able to effects on E.coli growth.
Since in IVF technology, the embryos are generated and cultured in in vitro condition, any environmental disruption, including EMF exposure may affect their survival and developmental abilities.
[4] The estimated overall prevalence of EMF was 19.8%, with the highest prevalence among persons 10 - 19 years of age (28.1%), more commonly in males.
"By continuously working closely with customers, EMF's main purpose is to be their preferred partner, by investing in time, resources, man-power, international networking and knowledge of the market to skillfully supply the right product to the right customer.
Note that in an ongoing study we have determined that the EMF around the energized cable dissipates to background levels at a distance of about one meter.
This introduction has four objectives: (1) describe the motivation for the EMF 24 study, (2) put this study in the context of other past and current IAM inter-model comparison projects, (3) describe the structure of this special issue of the Energy Journal, and (4) give a brief overview of the insights developed in the papers produced by the individual modeling teams that are included in this special issue.
Peoples are exposed to ELF EMF at their workplace as well as at the place of residence.
27 June 2014 - US optical detection and analysis technology developer Dynasil Corporation of America (NASDAQ:DYSL) said its unit, Evaporated Metal Films Corp (EMF), had taken over optical thin-film coating maker DichroTec Thin Films LLC.