EEG

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electroencephalogram

 (EEG) [e-lek″tro-en-sef´ah-lo-gram″]
the record produced by electroencephalography; a tracing of the electric impulses of the brain.
Sample of electroencephalogram tracings showing normal activity, seizure activity, and brain death.

EEG

EEG

(ē′ē′jē′)
n.
1. An electroencephalogram.
2. An electroencephalograph.

EEG

Electroencephalogram, electroencephalography

EEG

Abbreviation for electroencephalogram;
electroencephalography.

EEG

Abbrev. for ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM.

EEG (electroencephalogram)

a recording of the electrical changes occurring in the brain, produced by placing electrodes on the scalp and amplifying the electrical potential developed. The EEG shows three main types of wave called alpha, beta and delta, that differ in their rates of production. Delta waves are the slowest and are found normally only during sleep.

Electroencephalogram (EEG)

A record of the tiny electrical impulses produced by the brain's activity. By measuring characteristic wave patterns, the EEG can help diagnose certain conditions of the brain.

EEG

Abbreviation for electroencephalogram; electroencephalograph; electroencephalography.
References in periodicals archive ?
EEG epochs of 12-second duration were saved, from the artefact-free region of the recording under the supervision of two neurologists.
As EEG signal consists of both low frequency components and sparse-derivative components, LPF-TVD approach is effective in preprocessing.
Em relacao ao seguimento e a investigacao dos pacientes com perda subita e transitoria da consciencia, muitos especialistas acabam solicitando o exame de eletroencefalograma (EEG) com o proposito de tentar diagnosticar nos trabalhadores expostos a trabalho em altura causas neurologicas previamente desconhecidas, com a finalidade de prevenir mal subito (3).
O EEG e um exame que demonstra graficamente a atividade eletrica cerebral (3).
In the present study, we proposed an EEG decomposition method based on the sparsity and overcompleteness dictionary by specifying the best combination of dictionaries [31] and discussed the reason in the sense of the EEG frequency properties.
The production of other electric potentials from muscular, eyeball, and eyelid movements contaminates the scalp EEG in an evitable manner of leaking potentials in the electrophysiological system connecting the brain and muscular-skeletal system.
Many relatively lower cost devices have been introduced using EEG data [12-14].
This was a retrospective record review of patients who were referred for EEG over an 18 month-period at Sterkfontein psychiatric hospital, Gauteng, South Africa.
AMS is a significant challenge to emergency department (ED) physicians because it is a manifestation of a wide range of medical syndromes and does not indicate a specific diagnosis.3 Sudden onset diseases with AMS such as epilepsy metabolic disorders encephalopathy and encephalitis consist of a large proportion of ED admissions (up to 10% of the patients).34 The ED practitioner who is faced with a patient with AMS may find a quick EEG helpful in ensuring efficacious patient care.1 EEG may have a great value in AMS patients with normal neuroimaging findings.4 However EEG is underused or often not available in EDs.
In this study, a new approach based on ANFIS employing PE and SampEn measures was presented for classification of background EEG signals from ESES patients and controls.
The current literature highlights an interesting discussion regarding whether the EEG results suggestive of NCSE in those patients represent real seizure activity or whether the epileptiform discharges are misinterpreted and instead represent nonepileptiform PSWCs typical of CJD [2, 6].
All patients underwent neuroimaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT), with a <5-day interval to the EEG. Correlation of significant EBB regions and neuroimaging abnormalities were studied.