activities of daily living

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activities of daily living (ADLs),

Everyday routines generally involving functional mobility and personal care, such as bathing, dressing, toileting, and meal preparation. An inability to perform these renders one dependent on others, resulting in a self-care deficit. A major goal of occupational therapy is to enable the client to perform activities of daily living.
See also: instrumental activities of daily living scale.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ac·tiv·i·ties of daily liv·ing

(ADL) (ak-tiv'i-tēz dā'lē liv'ing)
Everyday routines generally involving functional mobility and personal care, such as bathing, dressing, toileting, and meal preparation. An inability to perform these renders one dependent on others, resulting in a self-care deficit. A major goal of occupational therapy is to enable the client to perform activities of daily living.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

activities of daily living

,

ADL

Tasks performed by people in a typical day that allow independent living. Basic activities of daily living (BADL) include feeding, dressing, hygiene, and mobility. Instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) include more advanced skills such as managing personal finances, using transportation, telephoning, cooking, performing household chores, doing laundry, and shopping.

The ability to perform activities of daily living may be hampered by illness or accident resulting in physical or mental disability. Health care rehabilitation workers play a significant role in teaching people to maintain or relearn these skills so that they can achieve the highest possible degree of independence.

Patient care

The nurse and other members of the rehabilitation team, including occupational and physical therapists, assess the patient's ability to perform ADLs. The rehabilitation team instructs and trains the patient in techniques to relearn the skill, or to accommodate for inability to perform the task. Where appropriate, family members are involved in the rehabilitation program. Referrals to community agencies are arranged when specific tasks cannot be performed independently. See: table

electronic aids to activities of daily living

Abbreviation: EADLs
Computerized or electronic devices that help people with functional limitations gain entry to and exit from buildings, use telephones and other household items, and enjoy leisure activities.

extended activities of daily living

Instrumental activities of daily living.

instrumental activities of daily living

Abbreviation: IADL
Those activities and tasks beyond basic self-care that are necessary for living independently. These activities include communication, mobility, cooking, using the telephone, cleaning the house, doing laundry, shopping, going to the bank, and managing medications.
Synonym: extended activities of daily living See: activities of daily living; self-care
CategoryActivitiesAffecting Factors
Personal careClimbing stairs, moving into and out of chair or bed, feeding oneself, opening containers, dressing, using toilet, maintaining hygiene, taking medicationAltered mobility, physical, mental, or emotional illness, elimination problems
Family responsibilitiesShopping, cooking, doing laundry, cleaning, caring for yard, caring for family and pets, managing moneyAltered mobility, heavy work schedule, insomnia, physical, mental, or emotional illness
Work or schoolFulfilling work responsibilities or school assignments, getting to and from work or schoolAltered mobility, stress, heavy family demands, job dissatisfaction, difficulties in school, physical, mental, or emotional illness
RecreationPursuing hobbies and interests, exercising, reading, watching televisionAltered mobility, physical, mental, or emotional illness
SocializationUsing the telephone, traveling, visiting family and friends, joining group activities, expressing sexualityAltered mobility, physical, mental, or emotional illness, relocation
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Some individuals purchase elaborate televisions, stereos, and other electronic devices; however, EADLs are usually considered devices that someone else should provide.
The use of EADLs may find greater support as these devices are integrated with other technologies.
Voice recognition and wireless access are becoming more commonplace for computers and EADLs, so systems based on these technologies will also likely increase.
EADL feedback to the user may be visual or auditory.
Direct connection implies that other devices are connected to the EADL unit.
When someone is deciding on an EADL, many factors must be considered, namely personal factors, equipment, environment, and funding.
The basic cost of a full EADL system can range from $3,500 to $6,000.
Due to lack of funding in general, technology transfer into EADL devices has been slow.