dyslipidemia

(redirected from Dyslipidemias)
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dyslipidemia

 [dis-lip″id-e´me-ah]
abnormality in, or abnormal amounts of, lipids and lipoproteins in the blood; see hyperlipidemia and hypolipidemia.

dyslipidemia

(dĭs-lĭp′ĭ-dē′mē-ə)
n.
An abnormal concentration of lipids or lipoproteins in the blood.

dys·lip′i·de′mic (-mĭk) adj.

dyslipidemia

Metabolic disease Any defect in lipoprotein metabolism–eg ↑ cholesterol, ↑ TGs, combined hyperlipidemia, and ↓ HDL-C; dyslipidemias may be 1º–ie nosologies a sui generis or 2º to other medical conditions–eg, DM or hypothyroidism

dys·lip·i·de·mi·a

(dis-lip'i-dē'mē-ă)
Any biochemical disorder characterized by one or more abnormal levels of blood lipids.
References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords: Diabetes mellitus, Diabetic neuropathy, Dyslipidemia.
(NASDAQ: ARWR) has dosed the first subjects in a Phase 1 clinical study of ARO-ANG3, an RNAi-based investigational medicine targeting angiopoietin like protein 3 (ANGPTL3) being developed for the treatment of dyslipidemias and metabolic diseases, the company said.
Dyslipidemia is characterized by an abnormal concentration of one or more of the blood lipids/lipoproteins (triglycerides [TG], cholesterol, high- [HDL] and low-[LDL] density lipoproteins) (1).
Our statistical analysis focused on the relationship between dyslipidemias and specifically multivessel disease, as relationships between dyslipidemias and CAC score in general have previously been described [6].
Dyslipidemias in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Nnewi South-East Nigeria.
Dyslipidemia and tobacco smoking synergistically increase serum manganese
It is seen more in patients over the age of fifty years and those who have diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia. Metabolic syndrome is in fact a major risk factor.
Traditionally, diabetic and hypertensive patients are screened for dyslipidemias. Most of the time non-diabetic and normotensive patients do not get scree-ned often as their disease is considered less life threa-tening.
In this study, patients with hypertension were more prone to dyslipidemias compared with those who were normotensives.
(1-3) Dyslipidemia or abnormal levels of blood lipids, such as hypercholesterolemia, begins from childhood and adolescence and can lead to premature atherosclerosis.
Dyslipidemia, characterized by alterations in the levels and composition of blood lipids, is a potential risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), stroke, and peripheral artery disease [1, 2].
Dyslipidemias, including hyperlipidemia (hypercholesterolemia) and low levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), are major causes of increased atherogenic risk.