dynorphin

(redirected from Dynorphins)
Also found in: Dictionary.

dy·nor·phin

(dī'nōr-fin),
An endogenous opioid ligand that acts as an agonist at opiate receptors. Extremely potent, widely distributed neuropeptide that has 17 amino acid residues and contains leu5-enkephalin as its NH2-terminal sequence.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dynorphin

(dī-nŏr′fĭn)
An opiate-like chemical found in the brain, which blocks transmission of pain signals along nerve fibers.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The analgesic effect of our electroacupuncture could be due to the release of endogenous opiates such as dynorphins, which is primarily released with high frequency electroacupuncture.
The preferred ligands of the mu receptor are beta-endorphin and enkephalin, those of the delta receptor are the leu- and met-enkephalines, and dynorphins A and B are those preferred by kappa receptors.
Similarly, receptors of other neuropeptides like somatostatin, neuropeptide Y, galanin, dynorphin, enkephalin, substance P, cholecystokinin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, hormones such as ghrelin, angiotensins, corticotropin-releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropin, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, oxytocin, and vasopressin involved in epilepsy [100].
Activation of the dynorphin/[kappa] receptor system can produce analgesic actions similar to other opioids but also actions that are opposite to those of [mu] opioid receptors in the motivational domain, where dynorphins produce aversive, dysphoric-like effects in animals and humans (Shippenberg et al.
Specific receptor for the opioid peptide dynorphin: Structure-activity relationships.
Thus, deregulation of noradrenaline, dynorphin, vasopressin, orexin, and substance P all appear to play a role in alcohol dependence (Koob 2008).
Morphine is an opioid; it mimics the effect of endogenous opioids such as encephalins, endorphins and dynorphins (Rang et al 1999).
The availability of endogenous opioid peptides, endorphins, enkephalins and dynorphins, led to the characterization of the opioid receptor subtypes, mu, delta, and kappa.
In addition to the modulating effects of GABA and serotonin, the release of endogenous opioids, b-endorphins, enkephalins and dynorphins will down-regulate the excitatory mechanisms that negatively affect the immune system.
The three main classes of endogenous opioids are endorphins, enkephalins, and dynorphins. Endorphins also are derived from POMC, which also is the precursor for ACTH.
The reverse, however, is true of dynorphins: They are known for putting a damper on emotional moods.
There are three major classes of endogenous opioid peptides: endorphins, enkephalins, and dynorphins. Each of these types of peptides is formed from larger precursor molecules that, depending on the enzymes present in a particular cell, are cut into smaller opioid molecules which then are released from the cells (Oswald and Wand 2004):