dyad

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dy·ad

(dī'ad),
1. A pair. Synonym(s): diad (2)
2. In chemistry, a bivalent element, molecule, or ion.
3. Two people in an interactional situation, for example, patient and therapist, husband and wife.
4. The double chromosome resulting from division in meiosis.
5. Two units treated as one.
6. A pair of cells resulting from the first meitotic division.
7. The transverse tubule and a terminal cisterna in cardiac muscle cells.
[G. dyas, the number two, duality]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dyad

(dī′ăd′, -əd)
n.
1. Two individuals or units regarded as a pair: the mother-daughter dyad.
2. Biology One pair of homologous chromosomes resulting from the division of a tetrad during meiosis.
3. Mathematics
a. A function that draws a correspondence from any vector u to the vector (v·u)w and is denoted vw, where v and w are a fixed pair of vectors and v·u is the scalar product of v and u. For example, if v = (2,3,1), w = (0,-1,4), and u = (a,b,c), then the dyad vw draws a correspondence from u to (2a + 3b + c)w.
b. A tensor formed from a vector in a vector space and a linear functional on that vector space.
adj.
Made up of two units.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

dyad

Psychiatry A 2-person relationship–eg, a therapeutic relationship between doctor and Pt in psychotherapy. See Folie á dieux. Cf Shared delusion.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dy·ad

(dī'ad)
1. A pair.
Synonym(s): diad (2) .
2. chemistry A bivalent element.
3. Two people in an interactional situation, e.g., patient and therapist, husband and wife.
4. The double chromosome resulting from the splitting of a tetrad during meiosis.
[G. dyas, the number two, duality]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dyad

a chromosome consisting of two sister CHROMATIDS joined at their centromere which is produced after DISJUNCTION.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 5 shows that participants in dyads of Group 3 performed as participants in Group 1, matching the increasing proportion of pieces placed by the confederate in the remote puzzle (0%, 50%, 100%) in the two blocks of experimental phases (1-3 and 4-6), both with and without points being provided to the participants.
Researchers rode in the cars with the participant dyads during the transitions to collect data but did not interact with the families.
* Triads, by contrast, perform considerably better than bomber-SSBN dyads of similar cost regarding the number of surviving US weapons if the US forces are in a day-to-day posture at the time of a large and accurate enemy attack.
In all four dyads this main overarching activity contained similar care related components or subactivities, including moving between bed and bathroom; getting medicine; washing upper body; getting (un)dressed; brushing hair and teeth; and receiving face cream or a shave.
Second, specific combination dyads for which significant differences in body weight at tagging were measured but no difference in body weight at harvesting were detected.
The first and fourth author collected inter-observer agreement (IOA) and procedural fidelity (PF) data at least 20% of sessions for each condition and participant: (a) probe sessions: assessed 21-27% of sessions for each condition across dyads; (b) peer preference instruction: 20-33%; (c) sharing during baseline sessions: 22-33%; (d) sharing instruction: 20-36%; (e) generalization of peer's preferences: 25%; and (f) generalization of sharing: 21-36%.
Overall the dyads reported to have spent between half an hour and one hour in the activity.
Finally, the parent-child dyad is at the core of the relationship between psychological and social influences.
In all, 125 PwMCI-CP dyads participated in the first wave.
A retrospective electronic chart review completed the charts of both newborns and their mothers identified as eligible mother-infant dyads. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Board at St.