Dutch elm disease


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Dutch elm disease

a disease of elm trees, caused by a fungus, Ceratostomella ulni, which blocks the XYLEM VESSELS, resulting in a lack of water to the aerial parts, leading to yellowing of the foliage, defoliation and eventual death. The fungus is carried by elm bark beetles such as Scolytus scolytus, which bore beneath the bark to lay eggs. The disease was probably introduced to Britain on timber imported from Canada, and reached epidemic proportions in the UK in the 1970s.
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Some cities and towns deal with Dutch elm disease through sanitation programs like Minneapolis's, considered the best method of containing the disease.
But those who still believe we have too many conifers in Wales can start replacing all those lost elms with the Princeton Elm, a variety with 96% resistance to Dutch Elm Disease.
It was seen first in the Netherlands (hence the name, Dutch Elm Disease), then spread through continental Europe and into the USA, ravaging the elm populations.
The plant survived the devastating Dutch elm disease that destroyed an estimated 25 million in the 60s and 70s - and has now been used to provide more than 2,000 healthy saplings.
We have lost too many champions to Dutch elm disease, chestnut blight, and oak wilt to believe that.
Experts fear it could cause more damage than Dutch elm disease - which has claimed 20 million UK elms since1970 - if it is not controlled.
Other notable new champions include a 523-point co-champion live oak in Waycross, Georgia, with a crown spread of nearly 50 yards; a 420-point co-champion American elm in Shelby County, Tennessee (a fortunate find given that its co-champ has been diagnosed as dying from Dutch elm disease); and eight species that previously had no champion: holacantha (Holacantha emoryi), redherry juniper (Juniperus erythrocarpa), Nebraska's dwarf chinkapin oak Quercus prinoides), Mohr oak (Quercus mohriana), orange (Citrus sinensis), jumping-bean sapium (Sapium biloculare).
We have an American elm (200+ years) that has had, and perhaps is still suffering with, Dutch elm disease. Two years ago tree surgeons did a drastic trim and shot the ground with medication, but we are noticing new distress.
The research team has created a batch of elm trees which can fight the deadly fungus that causes Dutch elm disease.
A swift-moving disease threatens California's signature tree, among others--and raises the specter of Dutch elm disease and chestnut blight.
The gnarled and twisted trunks, each between five and 10ft long, are from trees which died of Dutch Elm Disease in the 1970s.

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