dura

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du·ra mat·er

(dū'ră mā'tĕr), [TA]
Pachymeninx (as distinguished from leptomeninx, the combined pia mater and arachnoid); a tough, fibrous membrane forming the outer covering of the central nervous system, consisting of periosteal and meningeal dura layer and an inner part, the dural border cell layer, continuous with the arachnoid barrier cell layer.
Synonym(s): dura [TA], pachymeninx [TA]
[L. hard mother, mistransl. of Ar. umm al-jāfīyah, tough protector or covering]

dura

du·ra ma·ter

(dūr'ă mā'tĕr) [TA]
Pachymeninx (as distinguished from leptomeninx, the combined pia mater and arachnoid); a tough, fibrous membrane forming the outer covering of the central nervous system.
Synonym(s): dura.
[L. hard mother, mistransl. of Ar. umm al-jāfīyah, tough protector or covering]

Dura

The strongest and outermost of three membranes that protect the brain, spinal cord, and nerves of the cauda equina.
Mentioned in: Disk Removal
References in periodicals archive ?
Melencolia 1" (1514) by Albrecht Durer, part of a current exhibit at the Cleveland Museum of Art
Modern wireless technology, molecular biology, and encryption also trace to Durer and will be highlighted during the conference.
As an adolescent prodigy, Durer made a self-portrait in silverpoint, Self-Portrait at Thirteen, which he inscribed later with the date 1484.
Basel's art museum, the Kunstmuseum, contains a magnificent collection of work by artists active in the Upper Rhine region between 1400 and 1600, including those masters of graphic art who illustrated the first printed Bibles, principally Albrecht Durer, Hans Holbein, and Lucas Cranach.
Offering new insights into the artist's technique, Albrecht Durer and the Venetian Renaissance closely examines 25 of Durer's works (with a focus on Feast of the Rose Garlands), gradually disclosing the effects of Durer's apprenticeship in Venice.
Ulrich Grossmann, Director of the Germanisches Nationalmuseum, and his colleagues have initiated a new series entitled Durer Forschungen.
An artist working by the rule of thumb, without theoretical foundation, Durer maintained, was "a wild, unpruned tree," in need of the objective and rational standards of the Renaissance (3).
One of Price's most important chapters concerns Durer and the Jews.
The American art historian Arthur Burkhard states that the Isenheim altar clearly establishes Grunewald's claim to rank with Durer and Hans Holbein (the Younger, 1497?
There is evidence that Albrecht Durer used this technique.
In "The Undefeated" Hemingway repeats the Spanish word "duro," as well as its English translations and its cognates, particularly the Spanish durar and the French durer, to last.