placebo

(redirected from Dummy Pill)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Dummy Pill: put forward, Dummy drug

placebo

 [plah-se´bo] (L.)
1. a supposedly inert substance such as a sugar pill or injection of sterile water, given under the guise of effective treatment. Paradoxically, it may exert either a positive or a negative effect on the recipient (see placebo effect). A positive placebo effect can occur when caregiver and patient believe and expect a medication or procedure will relieve symptoms. Placebos are sometimes used in controlled clinical trials of new drugs; while some patients selected at random are given the new drug, others are given a placebo. It may be an active placebo that mimics the new drug's side effects. The patients taking the new drug must have significantly more relief of symptoms than the control group taking the placebo for the new drug to be considered to be effective. See also single blind, double blind, and triple blind.
2. the term has been extended to mean virtually any type of ineffective treatment, including surgery and psychotherapy. Use of placebos is ethically problematic because it deceives the patient. Ethical questions regarding the use of placebos include: (1) Is deception necessary to produce benefit? and (2) Do placebos have a nondeceptive use?

pla·ce·bo

(plă-sē'bō),
1. An inert substance given as a medicine for its suggestive effect.
2. An inert compound identical in appearance to material being tested in experimental research, which may or may not be known to the physician or patient, administered to distinguish between drug action and suggestive effect of the material under study.
Synonym(s): active placebo
[L. I will please, future of placeo]

placebo

(plə-sē′bō)
n. pl. place·bos or place·boes
a. A substance that has positive effects as a result of a patient's perception that it is beneficial rather than as a result of a causative ingredient.
b. An inactive substance or preparation used as a control in an experiment or test to determine the effectiveness of a medicinal drug.

placebo

An inactive material, often in the form of a capsule, pill or tablet, that is visually identical in appearance to a drug being tested in a clinical trial. The use of placebo control is a required component of the FDA’s drug approval process, as the agent must be proven more effective than the placebo.

Ethical questions are sometimes raised about certain uses of placebo controls, as when a negative or placebo control is required to evaluate the efficacy of a therapeutic manoeuvre (thereby denying the placebo group of the therapy’s potential benefit).

placebo

Medtalk An inactive material, in the form of a capsule, pill, or tablet, which is visually identical, and administered by the same route as a drug being tested; a chemically inert substance given in the guise of medicine for its psychologically suggestive effect; used in controlled clinical trials to determine whether improvement and side effects may reflect imagination or anticipation rather than the drug's power. See Dose control trial, Equivalence trial, Putative placebo trial. Cf Nocebo.

pla·ce·bo

(plă-sē'bō)
1. A medicinally inactive substance given as a medicine for its suggestive effect.
2. An inert compound identical in appearance to material being tested in experimental research, which may or may not be known to the physician or patient, administered to distinguish between drug action and suggestive effect of the material under study.
3. Any treatment or intervention with no intrinsic therapeutic value performed to achieve a "placebo effect."
[L. I will please, future of placeo]

placebo

1. A pharmacologically inactive substance made up in a form apparently identical to an active drug that is under trial. Both the placebo and the active drug are given, but the subjects are unaware which is which. This is done for the purpose of eliminating effects due to purely psychological causes.
2. A harmless preparation prescribed to satisfy a patient who does not require active medication. From the Latin placere, to please. See also PLACEBO EFFECT.

placebo

  1. any inactive substance given to satisfy a patient's psychological need for medication.
  2. a control in an experiment to test the effect of a drug.

Placebo

An inactive substance with no pharmacological action that is administered to some patients in clinical trials to determine the relative effectiveness of another drug administered to a second group of patients.

placebo 

A substance or a prescription (e.g. plano lenses) devoid of any physiological effect that is given merely to satisfy a patient. It is also used in research as a control against which the real effect of another product (similar in appearance) can be established. See single-blind study; randomized controlled trial.

pla·ce·bo

(plă-sē'bō)
Inert substance given as a medicine for its suggestive effect.
Synonym(s): active placebo.
[L. I will please, future of placeo]
References in periodicals archive ?
HIV infection rate with PreP pill versus placebo (dummy pill) Percent of men infected PrEP 1% (2/199) Placebo 7% (14/201) Rate per 100 person-years PrEP 0.91 Placebo 6.60 Note: Table made from bar graph.
Later studies found that dummy pills could raise pulse rates, blood pressure and reaction speed when people were told they had taken a stimulant; the opposite occurred when people were told that a drug would make them drowsy.
In fact, an analysis of 26 studies concluded that 32% of patients responded to dummy pills. This placebo effect has been so effective at times that pharmaceutical companies have found placebos often outperform their drugs.
For each trial, this test indicated that the tapping rate during the dummy pill treatment was significantly lower than the other two periods; whereas in no trial did the rates in the other two periods differ significantly from each other.
* Reyataz/Norvir plus Truvada (and an Epzicom dummy pill)
The Commons Science and Technology Committee said the diluted products were no more effective than placebo - the same as taking a sugar or dummy pill.
People taking it for 50 weeks had a slower decline in blood flow to the parts of the brain that are important for memory than those taking a dummy pill. Rember is the first drug to act on the tau tangles that develop in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease.
Researchers found little difference in mildly depressed patients who took the antidepressants Prozac, Effexor, Serzone and Seroxat/Paxil and those who took a dummy pill, or placebo.
They found that 18.3 percent of people given folic acid experienced a cardiovascular event, compared with 19.2 percent for people given a placebo (dummy pill).
The study, funded by Cancer Research UK, involved the women taking either 20mg of tamoxifen every day for five years or a dummy pill.
The women had either received three doses of the HPV-16/HPV-18 vaccine or a dummy pill.
The research, involving 3, 000 pregnant women, found that in those taking a 5 mg supplement of folate the risk of deaths from breast cancer was twice as great compared to those taking a dummy pill.