due diligence


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due diligence

Informatics A legal term for efforts to intercept potential problems before they occur–eg, monitoring for fraudulent claims, ensuring privacy and security under HIPAA, via audit trails, user authentication and access controls. See HIPAA.

due dil·i·gence

(dū dil'i-jĕns)
In health care, making certain that rules and procedures are followed to avoid harming patients and staff.
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Due diligence efforts should consider whether the company has the right people with the right skillsets to successfully manage the company through every stage--preclinical, clinical, and commercial.
Legal due diligence is undertaken by legal practitioners retained by the buyer.
But they all start with the due diligence. It should start no later than this week."
Failure to exert due diligence may (and perhaps should) be considered negligence.
There can be nine distinct areas to a due diligence process - from a financial audit, through to a marketing audit and then a legal audit, which will be particularly important on this occasion due to the on-going HMRC investigation surrounding United.
There are a few types of due diligence that stand out as almost always belonging on the critical list, with the big three being: 1) title review (and title insurance), 2) survey and 3) environmental inspection, i.e., a Phase I.
Due diligence basically means taking reasonable steps to ensure actions and information provided are correct.
On the other hand, it's impossible to perform due diligence on everyone and everything.
Some IP offerings simply are too expensive on their face to even warrant a due diligence analysis.
A strong compliance due diligence program should thoroughly review all applicable legal and regulatory requirements.
Due Diligence, one of just two three-year-olds among the 15 runners, has shown the better recent form, winning two of his three starts this season.
But a State may incur responsibility where there is a failure to exercise due diligence to prevent or respond to certain acts or omissions of non-State actors.