Duchenne muscular dystrophy


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Related to Duchenne muscular dystrophy: Becker muscular dystrophy

Du·chenne dys·tro·phy

(dū-shen'),
the most common childhood muscular dystrophy, with onset usually before age 6 years. Characterized by symmetric weakness and wasting of first the pelvic and crural muscles and then the pectoral and proximal upper extremity muscles; pseudohypertrophy of some muscles, especially the calf; heart involvement; sometimes mild mental retardation; progressive course and early death, usually in adolescence. X-linked inheritance (affects males and transmitted by females).

Duchenne muscular dystrophy

(do͞o-shĕn′)
n.
A severe form of muscular dystrophy that begins in early childhood and almost exclusively affects males, characterized by progressive weakening of the muscles and usually leading to death from respiratory or cardiac failure. It is caused by lack of the protein dystrophin in muscle cells as a result of a recessive genetic mutation on the X chromosome.

Duchenne muscular dystrophy

An X-R disease caused by a deficiency of a muscle protein, dystrophin, which affects 1:3500 ♂, resulting in progressive muscular atrophy, wasting, and death by age 20, often related to respiratory–due to compromised diaphragm activity, or cardiac failure; calf and deltoid muscles display the typical finding of pseudohypertrophy. See Climbing up on oneself, Dystrophin, Pseudohypertrophy.

Duchenne muscular dystrophy

A hereditary, X-linked RECESSIVE muscle disorder affecting males almost exclusively. It begins in the first three years of life and first affects the legs and buttocks. Usually, the muscles appear larger than normal (pseudo-hypertrophy) but are in fact very weak. The condition spreads to affect other muscles and death is usual between the age of 20 and 30. See also DYSTROPHIN. (Guillaume Benjamin Amand Duchenne, 1805–75, French neurologist).

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)

The most severe form of muscular dystrophy, DMD usually affects young boys and causes progressive muscle weakness, usually beginning in the legs.
Mentioned in: Muscular Dystrophy
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The researchers inserted a gene that produced a steady supply of EGF into the muscle of a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy before symptoms of the disease began.
12 Botteron S, Verdebout CM, Jeannet PY, Kiliaridis S.Orofacial dysfunction in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Arch Oral Biol.
The mission of New York-based Michael's Cause is to raise awareness of Duchenne muscular dystrophy as well as direct funding for research by building a strong foundation for future treatments and a possible cure.
"It is deeply encouraging that today, more and more therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy are reaching clinical trials.
Risk assessment and genetic counseling in families with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Acfo Myol.
Duchenne muscular dystrophy: pathogenetic aspects and genetic prevention.
Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which affects 1 in 3,600 boys, is a neuromuscular disease caused by a shortage of a protein called dystrophin, leading to progressive muscle weakness.
"There are currently no effective treatments for patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy," Ward said.
The first scientific evidence on the beneficial effect of steroids in Duchenne muscular dystrophy was documented over 40 years ago by Drachman et al.
The company's lead candidate, CAP-1002, is an "off-the-shelf" cardiac cell therapy that is currently in clinical development for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.
The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted approval to United States-based Akashi Therapeutics to resume clinical development of HT-100 (delayed-release halofuginone) in patients with any of the genetic mutations that cause Duchenne muscular dystrophy, it was reported yesterday.