dualism

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du·al·ism

(dū'ăl-izm),
1. In chemistry, a theory advanced by Berzelius that every compound, no matter how many elements enter into it, is composed of two parts, one electrically negative, the other positive; still applicable, with modification, to polar compounds, but inapplicable to nonpolar compounds.
2. In hematology, the concept that blood cells have two origins, that is, lymphogenous and myelogenous.
3. The theory that the mind and body are two distinct systems, independent and different in nature.
[L. dualis, relating to two, fr. duo, two]

dualism

(do͞o′ə-lĭz′əm, dyo͞o′-)
n.
1. The condition of being double; duality.
2. Psychology The view that mental and physical properties are fundamentally different and that neither can be explained fully in terms of the other.

du′al·ist n.
du′al·is′tic adj.
du′al·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

du·al·ism

(dū'ăl-izm)
1. chemistry theory that every compound, no matter how many elements enter into it, is composed of two parts, one electrically negative, the other positive; applicable to polar compounds but not to nonpolar compounds.
2. hematology the concept that blood cells have two origins, i.e., lymphogenous and myelogenous.
3. The theory that the mind and body are two distinct systems, independent and different in nature.
[L. dualis, relating to two, fr. duo, two]

dualism

(doo'a-lizm, du'a) [L. dualis, containing two + -ism]
1. The condition of being double or twofold.
2. The theory that human beings consist of two entities, mind and matter, that are independent of each other. Synonym: mind-body duality
3. The theory that various blood cells arise from two types of stem cells: myeloblasts, giving rise to the myeloid elements, and lymphoblasts, giving rise to the lymphoid elements.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dualists have offered some solutions to this problem.
The researchers controlled for this theory sensitivity by (a) not knowing either the identity of the trainees or their Perry position at the time of the initial analysis, (b) having two other researchers conduct independent initial analyses of interview transcripts, and (c) asking two additional researchers to cluster the initial notes into themes "blind," that is, unaware of whether they were naming themes for dualists or relativists.
Three of the European areas in which dualist and Gnostic atavisms are presumed to have thrived--Languedoc and Catalonia, Bosnia and Hercegovina, and Bulgaria and Macedonia--were, and to a great extent remain, classic frontier zones.
Tetlock's (1986, 1989) work suggests that dualists and moral relativists are likely to differ in the degree to which they are motivated to engage in the complex reasoning required to solve the value balance dilemma.
This dualist talk begins to sound familiar to modern ears accustomed to the theme of "separation of church and state.
To establish the initial conceivability premise, Dualists can just point to the chauvinism-liberalism problem haunting IT and Functionalism.
Those, like Bruce Ackerman, who straddle between procedural nonexclusivism and substantive exclusivism, are "democratic dualists.
Waiting in the wings are some dualists who claim that all materialist accounts fail to avoid the Problem of Too Many Thinkers.
Several scholars, notably Bernard Hamilton, offer new forays into a question that is by now over 50 years old: did medieval dualists come from Balkan Bogomil missionaries?
11] Dualists are "literal-minded" and "want the "right answer.
In what follows I assume that the new dualists are right in thinking that (human) persons are material objects.
2) He maps the terrain of theory as being divided into monists ("Anglophiles"), rights foundationalists ("Germanophiles"), and dualists (red-blooded Americans).