dualism

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du·al·ism

(dū'ăl-izm),
1. In chemistry, a theory advanced by Berzelius that every compound, no matter how many elements enter into it, is composed of two parts, one electrically negative, the other positive; still applicable, with modification, to polar compounds, but inapplicable to nonpolar compounds.
2. In hematology, the concept that blood cells have two origins, that is, lymphogenous and myelogenous.
3. The theory that the mind and body are two distinct systems, independent and different in nature.
[L. dualis, relating to two, fr. duo, two]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dualism

(do͞o′ə-lĭz′əm, dyo͞o′-)
n.
1. The condition of being double; duality.
2. Psychology The view that mental and physical properties are fundamentally different and that neither can be explained fully in terms of the other.

du′al·ist n.
du′al·is′tic adj.
du′al·is′ti·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

du·al·ism

(dū'ăl-izm)
1. chemistry theory that every compound, no matter how many elements enter into it, is composed of two parts, one electrically negative, the other positive; applicable to polar compounds but not to nonpolar compounds.
2. hematology the concept that blood cells have two origins, i.e., lymphogenous and myelogenous.
3. The theory that the mind and body are two distinct systems, independent and different in nature.
[L. dualis, relating to two, fr. duo, two]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dualism

(doo'a-lizm, du'a) [L. dualis, containing two + -ism]
1. The condition of being double or twofold.
2. The theory that human beings consist of two entities, mind and matter, that are independent of each other. Synonym: mind-body duality
3. The theory that various blood cells arise from two types of stem cells: myeloblasts, giving rise to the myeloid elements, and lymphoblasts, giving rise to the lymphoid elements.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Importantly, stimulus and response occur "in a wider dynamic context" (culture) that incorporates aims and interests as well as "an environment, which contains the problems and surprises that spur us on to grow." (35) Dewey suggested an alternative coordinated circuit illustrating dichotomies similar to stimulus and response that cloaks "ancient psychophysical dualisms" such as mind/body, thought/action, ends/means, and theory/practice.
"Dualism is the belief that the world is ruled by the antagonistic forces of good and evil." (Morrison and Ezzo) Elements of dualism are present however, in later Montagnais cosmology, and are illustrated through two brothers--Nipinoukhe (Summer-maker) and Piponoukhe (Winter-maker).
The book is unusual in legal studies, for it applies the psychological and anthro-political concept of the Manichean Delirium to the concept of legal dualism or pluralism, which I would define as a system of competing, even contradictory, legal principles and cultures.
To Quinones' pleasant surprise, it seems, the dualisms that follow and form the content of this book all adhere to the same patterns of tension, contrast, and mutuality as that of Erasmus and Luther.
The second aspect of Dualisms is its torrential supply of learning--textual, biographical, historical--and here I must enter a regret.
I have argued that the fact/value and appearance/reality dualisms have structured counseling discourse throughout its history.
Because the videos are looped, both skirmishes are ambiguous in outcome, time breaking down without clear ending or beginning: In this sense, it's not such a stretch to see Dualism 2 and 3 as allegorical, given our nation's present morass in the Middle East, with two separate wars persisting more than four years after a declaration of "mission accomplished"--especially given the artist's recurring interest in the follies of historical reenactment.
I conclude that More saw in Proust's dualism of memory versus phenomena a human recoil from the existentialism evident in Bergson's dynamism.
Such dualism is, of course, the antithesis of naturalism, which understands existence to be of a piece, not split into the natural and supernatural.
The movement away from the body has caused all kinds of dualisms.
And essays may do so in the act of claiming for Walker the transcendence of romance, reinscribing one of several critical dualisms that survive in this collection.
Abstract: The paper answers the question, "Why is it that women who compete in highly competitive physical activities need to express their femininity so overtly?" I argue that traditional Western dualisms have created a paradox for women in athletics.