dualism

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du·al·ism

(dū'ăl-izm),
1. In chemistry, a theory advanced by Berzelius that every compound, no matter how many elements enter into it, is composed of two parts, one electrically negative, the other positive; still applicable, with modification, to polar compounds, but inapplicable to nonpolar compounds.
2. In hematology, the concept that blood cells have two origins, that is, lymphogenous and myelogenous.
3. The theory that the mind and body are two distinct systems, independent and different in nature.
[L. dualis, relating to two, fr. duo, two]

dualism

(do͞o′ə-lĭz′əm, dyo͞o′-)
n.
1. The condition of being double; duality.
2. Psychology The view that mental and physical properties are fundamentally different and that neither can be explained fully in terms of the other.

du′al·ist n.
du′al·is′tic adj.
du′al·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

du·al·ism

(dū'ăl-izm)
1. chemistry theory that every compound, no matter how many elements enter into it, is composed of two parts, one electrically negative, the other positive; applicable to polar compounds but not to nonpolar compounds.
2. hematology the concept that blood cells have two origins, i.e., lymphogenous and myelogenous.
3. The theory that the mind and body are two distinct systems, independent and different in nature.
[L. dualis, relating to two, fr. duo, two]

dualism

(doo'a-lizm, du'a) [L. dualis, containing two + -ism]
1. The condition of being double or twofold.
2. The theory that human beings consist of two entities, mind and matter, that are independent of each other. Synonym: mind-body duality
3. The theory that various blood cells arise from two types of stem cells: myeloblasts, giving rise to the myeloid elements, and lymphoblasts, giving rise to the lymphoid elements.
References in periodicals archive ?
Morrison and Ezzo) Elements of dualism are present however, in later Montagnais cosmology, and are illustrated through two brothers--Nipinoukhe (Summer-maker) and Piponoukhe (Winter-maker).
The book is unusual in legal studies, for it applies the psychological and anthro-political concept of the Manichean Delirium to the concept of legal dualism or pluralism, which I would define as a system of competing, even contradictory, legal principles and cultures.
This should remind us that above all what we finding genuine dualisms is a noble engagement .
His epistemology located perception in the object perceived, in order to defeat Cartesianism's false dualism that isolated the mind from the perceived universe.
Such dualism is, of course, the antithesis of naturalism, which understands existence to be of a piece, not split into the natural and supernatural.
The advocacy by some theorists of an Aristotelean framework of A/B terms in place of dichotomy proposes to solve the problem of dualisms in the ostrich-like way of refusing to allow us to represent them.
Overcoming the dualisms in all our practices and integrating the sacred and the ordinary will go much farther toward promoting the social ministry of the church than our past efforts.
Light against darkness; dualism in ancient Mediterranean religion and the contemporary world.
suggests, can overcome life's many dualisms and the negative or exploitative assessment of women's bodies characteristic of much contemporary culture.
Nor is Ayn Rand's method systematically aimed at "overcoming dualisms.
I find this puzzling, given his stated goal of overcoming dualities and dualisms of all kinds.
I would like to suggest that what is going on here is a fundamental confusion about the theological meaning of immanence and transcendence shared by both feminists and antifeminists that allows feminist thought to be caught in the underside of the same dualisms that it seeks to oppose in its emphasis on the immanence of God.