Du Bois-Reymond


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Du Bois-Rey·mond

(dū-bwah' rā-mohn'),
Emil H., German physiologist, 1818-1896. See: Du Bois-Reymond law.
References in periodicals archive ?
Remarks: Due to their body length and width (L: 585 gm; W: 66 [micro]m), our specimens resemble those reported in Brazil as Nerilla mediterranea (L: < 1 000 [micro]m; W: 100 [micro]m) (Du Bois-Reymond Marcus, 1947; Di Domenico, 2012).
(2000); 2) Para state, in the municipality of Fordlandia by Marcus (1942); Du Bois-Reymond Marcus (1947, 1949a); in Cupari River, in the municipality of Obidos by Marcus (1942); Du Bois-Reymond Marcus (1947, 1949a, b); 3) Parana state, in Baia River, in the municipality of Baytapora by Behrend et al.
The first investigations of water bears (Phylum Tardigrada) in the West Indies were made in the mid-Twentieth Century, when du Bois-Reymond Marcus [1] found four species in the Netherlands Antilles.
The first investigations of water bears in the West Indies were made in the mid-Twentieth Century, when du Bois-Reymond Marcus (1960) found four species in the Netherlands Antilles.
In Chapter 15, du Bois-Reymond addresses the complexities of youth transition policies in Europe under three themes: the mismatch between today's young people and their learning environments; migrants, racism, and resulting "insider" and "outsider" status; and the future and fate of young families within aging societies.
An ideal supplement to the catalogue is a chapter "Short biographies of collectors" as some of them are hardly known today, like Adolf Dirr (1867-1930), a major expert on Caucasian languages, who earned his living as a teacher in the Caucasus and later worked as an interpreter and staff member of the Munich Ethnological Museum, and Marie Du Bois-Reymond (1864-?), wife of Claude du Bois-Reymond, professor at the German Medical School in Shanghai.
In a June interview with the Mittelland Zeitung and the Basler Zeitung, du Bois-Reymond claimed that the SVP initiative would see up to a four-fold increase in current deportation figures, with even relatively trivial crimes being reason enough for deportation.
It was not until 1843 that an "action potential" was described by German physiologist Emil Du Bois-Reymond. Using a galvanometer with 24,000 turns of wire in the coil, his instrument was sensitive enough to detect the small voltage variations during muscle contraction (2).
Du Bois-Reymond has earlier said that the average prices of hearing instruments in Switzerland had gone up although the production costs had decreased.
In 1880, Emil du Bois-Reymond made a famous speech before the Berlin Academy of Sciences outlining the "Seven Riddles of the World".
It is also cited in Sweden (Brattstrom 1943), in Brazil (Du Bois-Reymond 1949), in the west coast of Sweden (Silen 1952), in Norway (Lonoy 1953) and New Zealand (Silen 1956).