scanner

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Related to Drum scanner: Film scanner

scanner

 [skan´er]
1. a device that converts an image, such as from a patient, to a format appropriate for viewing on a computer or being transmitted electronically.
2. equipment used for producing a scan or scanning.

scan·ner

(skan'ĕr),
A device or instrument that scans.

scanner

(skăn′ər)
n.
1. An optical scanner.
2. A device, such as a CT scanner or PET scanner, for observing internal organs, tissues, and other parts of the body.

scanner

Imaging A popular term for a device used for various imaging procedures–eg, CT scanner Instrumentation A device that measures differences in chromatic or radioactive intensity on a 2-D matrix–eg, electropherogram or chromatogram, to quantify various substances

scan·ner

(skan'ĕr)
A device or instrument that scans.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 1 shows a chest radiograph image obtained with a drum scanner and a histogram of pixel values in the part shown in the image.
As other characteristics of pneumoconiosis images obtained with CCD scanner by the observation: 1) density in outside of the lung area is higher and inside of the lung area is lower than drum scanner, and, 2) the opacities tend to appear around rib edges since the contrast is extremely high near the edges.
ScanView offers a broad line of drum scanners, including the ScanMate 3000, a single-pass unit with three photomultiplier tubes (PMTs).
Unlike with drum scanners, preparing a film for a transparency scanner requires little time and no special skills.
Drum scanners are extremely highend units with similar price tags, $20,000 to $45,000.
DESKTOP SCANNERS ARE changing the landscape of graphic arts production by displacing large drum scanners and moving prepress composition power closer to designers and publishers, according to A.F.
Testing in Arlington was performed on the recording half of what Kirkhart described as a magazine version of "old-technology" Ricoh drum scanners. The success of tests on the 12-year-old equipment, modified for Verde by Xerox, demonstrated the suplier's flexibility, according to Kirkhart.
What was not down was technology supporting the industry's future: continued work on offset and flexo printing, new mailroom products, controls and systems communication, better deinking and more recycled newsprint capacity, electronic data interchange to standardize and electronically streamline advertising and other commercial transactions, progress in pagination, digital wirephoto delivery, adoption of picture desks and better, smaller drum scanners, photo transmitters, even satellite transceivers.
For scanning larger transparent and reflective media, newspapers no longer must choose between comparatively lower-quality scans from smaller, less costly CCD-based flatbed scanners and high-quality scans obtainable from large drum scanners using photomultiplier tubes.