Dracunculus


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Dracunculus

 [drah-kung´ku-lus]
a genus of parasitic nematodes. D. medinen′sis is a threadlike worm widely distributed in North America, Africa, the Middle East, Indonesia, and India; frequently found in the subcutaneous and intermuscular tissues of humans and certain other animals. See illustration.
Dracunculus medinensis. From Dorland's, 2000.

Dracunculus

(dra-kŭng'kyū-lŭs),
A genus of nematodes (superfamily Dracunculoidea) that have some resemblances to true filarial worms; however, adults are larger (females being as long as 1 m), and the intermediate host is a freshwater crustacean rather than an insect.
[L. dim. of draco, serpent]

Dracunculus

/Dra·cun·cu·lus/ (-lus) a genus of nematode parasites, including D. medinen´sis (guinea worm), a threadlike worm, 30–120 cm. long, widely distributed in India, Africa, and Arabia, inhabiting subcutaneous and intermuscular tissues of humans and other animals.

Dra·cun·cu·lus

(dră-kŭng'kyū-lŭs)
A genus of nematodes with some resemblance to true filarial worms; adults are larger and the intermediate host is a freshwater crustacean rather than an insect.
[L. dim. of draco, serpent]

Dracunculus

a genus of spiruroid nematode parasites in the family Dracunculidae. Includes D. alii, D. dahomensis, D. globocephalus, D. ophidensis (all in reptiles), D. fuelliborni (in opossum); D. lutrae (in otter),

Dracunculus insignis
a spiruroid worm infesting dogs and wild carnivores. Causes cutaneous lesions and ulcers, sometimes internal lesions, e.g. in heart and vertebral column. Called also dragon, fiery dragon, guinea worm.
Dracunculus medinensis
a thread-like worm widely distributed in North America, Africa, the Near East, East Indies and India; frequently found in the subcutaneous and intermuscular tissues of humans and also in dogs, sometimes horses and cattle. Causes cutaneous nodules and subsequently ulcers.
References in periodicals archive ?
The emergence of Dracunculus infections in domestic dogs in Chad and program disruptions caused by civil unrest and insecurity in Mali and South Sudan are now the greatest challenges to interrupting transmission.
Plant material (Folium dracunculi) was obtained from Artemisia dracunculus L.
The cats that contracted the Dracunculus insignis worms likely ingested the parasites by drinking unfiltered water or by hunting frogs," says Araceli Lucio-Forster, Ph.
Comparative Analysis of Secondary Metabolites of Artemisia dracunculus L.
Clinical Manifestations, Disability and Use of Folk Medicine in Dracunculus Infection in Nigeria.
The results of goodness of fit test ([chi square]) showed that there is significant differences at 1% level between essential oils of Achillea wilhelmsii, Ziziphora clinopodioides, Artemisia dracunculus, Thymus vulgaris, Salvia multicaulis, Mentha piperata, Lavandula angustifolia, Melissa officinalis, Artemisia absinthum and Carum carvi with control.
I've lost my Dracunculus due to the wet over the last couple of years, and there are other flowers, like lilies, which I can't grow in the open ground at all, as it's too damp in winter.
The word tarragon comes from the French word esdragon, meaning "little dragon," which is also the meaning of dracunculus, its Latin species name.
133] Dracunculus vulgaris Schott [230] Helicodiceros muscivorus (L.
It is cultivated commercially in Costa Rica as a spice herb; it contains an oil having an anise-like odor, and the fresh aerial parts of this plant are sold in the supermarket as a substitute of tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus L.
Col (1903, citado por Lersten y Curtis, 1987) senalo para Artemisia dracunculus la coalescencia de cavidades cortas para formar ductos o una estructura alargada.