doxorubicin

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doxorubicin

 [dok″so-roo´bĭ-sin]
an antitumor antibiotic that binds to DNA, inhibits synthesis of nucleic acids, and inhibits cell division. It has one of the widest spectrums of antitumor activity of any antineoplastic agent and is administered intravenously as the hydrochloride salt. Side effects include bone marrow depression, alopecia, and cardiac toxicity; electroencephalogram monitoring is required during its administration. A liposome-encapsulated preparation of the hydrochloride salt is used in the treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dox·o·ru·bi·cin

(doks'ō-rū'bi-sin),
An antineoplastic antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces peucetius; also used in cytogenetics to produce Q-type chromosome bands.
Synonym(s): adriamycin
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

doxorubicin

(dŏk′sə-ro͞o′bĭ-sĭn)
n.
An antibiotic obtained from the bacterium Streptomyces peuceticus, used as an anticancer drug.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ABDIC

A "salvage" chemotherapy regimen used for patients who have a disease—e.g., lymphoma—relapse after radiation therapy or chemotherapy.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

doxorubicin

Adriamycin Oncology An anthracycline antibiotic used for leukemias, lymphomas, sarcomas, solid tumors Adverse effects BM suppression, alopecia, vomiting, stomatitis, dose-dependent cardiomyopathy. See Chemotherapy.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dox·o·ru·bi·cin

(doks'ō-rū'bi-sin)
An antineoplastic antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces peucetius; also used in cytogenetics to produce Q-type chromosome bands.
Synonym(s): adriamycin.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

doxorubicin

An antibiotic, also known as Adriamycin, that interferes with the synthesis of DNA and is thus useful an an anticancer agent. It has many side effects including loss of hair, sickness and vomiting, interference with blood production and heart damage. The drug is on the WHO official list. A brand name is Caelyx.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Colan et al., "Doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy," The New England Journal of Medicine, vol.
The risk of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy is dose dependent (7,8), with cardiomyopathy developing in 30% of patients once total doxorubicin doses of 550 mg/[m.sup.2] have been attained (8).
Cao et al., "Cannabidiol protects against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy by modulating mitochondrial function and biogenesis," Molecular Medicine, vol.
Ioannidis et al., "Oleuropein prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy interfering with signaling molecules and cardiomyocyte metabolism," Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, vol.
Xi, "Dietary nitrate supplementation protects against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy by improving mitochondrial function," Journal of the American College of Cardiology, vol.
Curcumin has been used to attenuate acute doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy in rats [133].
Zhou et al., "Thrombopoietin protects against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy, improves cardiac function, and reversely alters specific signalling networks," European Journal of Heart Failure, vol.