doubling time

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doubling time

the time it takes for the number of cells in a neoplasm to double, with shorter doubling times implying more rapid growth.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Experimental biology The time necessary for a zygote or cells in culture to increase two-fold; the doubling time is usually longer than the average generation time of the individual cells of the population as there are growth constraints on the population—e.g., nutritional, senescence, death
Oncology A parameter used to determine tumour aggressiveness, which serves to prognosticate, measure therapeutic success, and quantify tumour kinetics and growth rate
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

doubling time

Oncology A parameter used to determine tumor aggressiveness, which serves to prognosticate, measure therapeutic success, and quantify tumor kinetics and growth rate. Cf Gompertzian growth curve.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

doub·ling time

(dŭb'ling tīm)
The time it takes for the number of cells in a neoplasm to double, with shorter doubling times implying more rapid growth.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

doubling time

or

generation time

(in microbiology) the time in which the number of cells in a population doubles.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
When [[alpha].sub.2] > 0.2450, system (5) loses its stability and undergoes doubling period bifurcations to chaos.
It is found that the oligopoly market may become unstable and even fall into chaos via doubling period bifurcations with the changes of the output adjustment speed parameters.
If the doubling period of change is very long, especially in comparison to the human life span, it is extremely difficult to notice any change at all.
Even today, our awareness of change will naturally tend to be averaged over the doubling period of the change and, therefore, cause it to appear to be approximately linear.
Hanson suggested the next transformation--possibly involving information technology, nanotechnology, robotics, and/or artificial intelligence--could move the doubling period of GDP from decades to weeks and is forecast to appear sometime this century.