double helix

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helix

 [he´liks] (pl. he´lices, helixes) (Gr.)
1. a winding structure; see also coil and spiral.
2. the superior and posterior free margin of the pinna of the ear.
α-helix (alpha helix) the complex structural arrangement of parts of protein molecules in which a single polypeptide chain forms a right-handed helix.
double helix (Watson-Crick helix) the structure of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), consisting of two coiled chains, each of which contains information completely specifying the other chain.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Wat·son-Crick he·lix

(waht'sŏn crik),
the helical structure assumed by two strands of deoxyribonucleic acid, held together throughout their length by hydrogen bonds between bases on opposite strands, referred to as Watson-Crick base pairing. See: base pair.
[James Dewey Watson, Francis H. C. Crick]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

double helix

n.
The coiled structure of double-stranded DNA in which strands linked by hydrogen bonds form a spiral configuration, with the two strands oriented in opposite directions.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

double helix

A structural motif of nucleic acids in which 2 complementary chains of DNA and/or RNA spiral around each other as paired nucleobases attached to a deoxyribose phosphate backbone
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Wat·son-Crick he·lix

(waht'sŏn-krik' hē'liks)
The helical structure assumed by two strands of deoxyribonucleic acid, held together throughout their length by hydrogen bonds between bases on opposite strands, referred to as Watson-Crick base pairing.
See also: base pair
Synonym(s): DNA helix, double helix.
[James Dewey Watson, Francis H. C. Crick]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

double helix

see DNA.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Watson,

James Dewey, U.S. geneticist and Nobel laureate, 1928–.
Watson-Crick helix - the helical structure assumed by two strands of deoxyribonucleic acid. Synonym(s): DNA helix; double helix; twin helix
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Equations (13a)-(14b) can possibly describe the dynamics of the interaction of two DNA double helix structures with each other at the discrete level in the form of a twist-like deformation.
With the DNA inside the instrument, the team measured how the frequency of sound waves running along the double helix structure changed with their wavelength.
DNA - James Watson and Francis Crick's discovery in 1953 of the double helix structure of DNA, pictured below, the genetic code for all living things 2.
5 is "Watson and Crick elucidate DNA's double helix structure, 1953." I am annoyed that, as usual in articles about the early understanding of DNA, Rosalind Franklin's name has been left off.
Not since Watson and Crick discovered the double helix structure of DNA molecules has there been a giant step forward in cancer research such as this.
Francis Crick (1916-2004), a British scientist, along with James Watson, an American, was the first to suggest a double helix structure for DNA.
She later conceded this was a misspelling of Francis Crick, the Nobel Prize-winning biologist who, along with James Watson, discovered the double helix structure of DNA.
At the core of the work to your left is a single helix, which is relatively simple compared to the double helix structure of a tiny DNA molecule.
Francis Crick, co-discoverer of the double helix structure of DNA, argued that the code may have been a "frozen accident," becoming so deeply embedded in the core machinery of life at some point in the distant past that any further change became impossible, notes Hayes, a senior writer for American Scientist.
These researchers discovered the ladder-like double helix structure of DNA, helping to start the biotechnology revolution now underway.
On April 25, 1953, they published their paper in the science journal Nature and their theory of the double helix structure of DNA was unleashed on the world.
biologist James Watson and his collaborator Francis Crick discovered the double helix structure of DNA.