double bond

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Related to Double bonds: conjugated double bonds

dou·ble bond

a covalent bond resulting from the sharing of two pairs of electrons, for example, H2C=CH2 (ethylene).

dou·ble bond

(dŭb'ĕl bond)
A covalent bond resulting from the sharing of two pairs of electrons.
References in periodicals archive ?
In most types of unsaturated fatty acids, the double bonds are separated by a single --C[H.sub.2]-- (methylene) group.
Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is an omega-3 fatty acid containing 18 carbons and three double bonds.
There is an additional classification for unsaturated fatty acids that relates to the stereochemistry of the hydrogen atoms around the double bonds. The vast majority of fatty acids in nature have the hydrogen atoms across double bonds arranged in a cis configuration; however, they may also appear in a trans form [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 2 OMITTED].
The above discussion implied that the two OH groups are at C-1 and C-3, and two trans oriented double bonds one at C-4/C-5 and another between C-8/C-9 (J= 15 Hz).
The reaction speed of ozone with double bonds of rubber components is dependent not only on environmental influences, but also on the structure of the respective polymer.
Although the deterministic ODE models developed in this study do not accurately predict the nonlinear dependence of the gelation time on both the photoinitiator loading concentration and the functionality of the monomers in the absence of oxygen, the literature is full of successful applications of the deterministic approach to the chemical kinetics of polymerization of monomers with one or two double bonds [1-4, 16, 24], As can be seen from Fig.
whose C = C double bonds are different in polymerization reactivity.
The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences describes metathesis as a dance that capitalizes on the double bonds of the participants.
For tung oil, with mostly conjugated double bonds from eleostearic acid (~ 77-82 percent eleostearic acid), the rate of autoxidation is much higher than that observed in linolenic acid, due to the conjugation.
All vegetable oils consist of triglyceride molecules, which may contain one, two, or three double bonds. If exposed to oxygen at high temperatures, the molecules oxidize easily and form bonds, causing the fluid to increase in viscosity or even form a gel.
Chevron Phillips Chemical Co.'s alpha olefins, featuring highly accessible terminal double bonds, are major petrochemical building blocks used in a wide variety of applications.