donor

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Related to Donors: universal donors

donor

 [do´ner]
1. a person or organism that supplies an organ or tissue to be used in another body, usually either a cadaveric, living related, or living unrelated donor; see transplantation.
2. a substance or compound that contributes part of itself to another substance (acceptor).
Algorithm for organ donation. From McQuillan, 2002.
cadaveric donor an organ or tissue donor who has already died; see cadaveric donor transplantation.
living nonrelated donor living unrelated donor.
living related donor one who is a close blood relative of the recipient; see living related donor transplantation.
living unrelated donor one who is not a close blood relative of the recipient; see living unrelated donor transplantation.
non–heart beating cadaveric donor a donor who has been pronounced dead according to the traditional criteria of lack of any pulse or detectable cardiac activity, but is not yet brain dead (see brain death). There are two types: The controlled donor is a person in a vegetative state who has signed a consent form or otherwise stated his or her wishes before becoming ill. Based on the patient's stated wishes and at the request of the next-of-kin, cannulas are placed into blood vessels for postmortem cooling of organs and the person is removed from life support. Once death has been declared, the organs are rapidly perfused with cold preservative solution and surgically removed. The uncontrolled donor is a person declared dead because of catastrophic injury to the heart, such as a gunshot wound to the heart. Cannulas are placed into blood vessels after death and the organs are perfused and removed. This also requires consent of next-of-kin.
universal donor a person whose blood is type O in the ABO blood group system; such blood is sometimes used in emergency transfusion. Transfusion of blood cells rather than whole blood is preferred.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

do·nor

(dō'nŏr),
1. A person from whom blood, tissue, or an organ is taken for transplantation.
2. A compound that will transfer an atom or a radical to an acceptor; for example, methionine is a methyl donor; glutathione is a glutamyl donor.
3. An atom that readily yields electrons to an acceptor, for example, nitrogen, which will donate both electrons to a shared pool in forming a coordinate bond.
[L. dono, pp. donatus, to donate, to give]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

donor

(dō′nər)
n.
1. Medicine An individual from whom blood, tissue, or an organ is taken for transfusion, implantation, or transplant.
2. Chemistry An atom, molecule, or ion that provides a part to combine with an acceptor, especially an atom that provides two electrons to form a bond with another atom.
3. Electronics An element introduced into a semiconductor with a negative valence greater than that of the pure semiconductor.
adj.
Medicine Used for transfusion, implantation, or transplant: a donor organ.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

donor

The giver of a tissue, an organ, blood or blood products; in the usual parlance, an altruistic person who contributes blood products, often regularly. See Anencephalic organ donor, Oxydonor, Universal donor.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

do·nor

(dō'nŏr)
1. A person from whom blood, tissue, or an organ is taken for transplantation.
2. A compound that will transfer an atom or a radical to an acceptor.
3. An atom that readily yields electrons to an acceptor.
[L. dono, pp. donatus, to donate, to give]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

donor

A person, or cadaver, from whom blood, tissue or an organ is taken for transfusion or transplantation into another.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

donor

an individual supplying tissue (e.g. blood), genetic material to a recipient. See COMPATIBILITY, ABO BLOOD GROUP, UNIVERSAL DONOR RECIPIENT, CONJUGATION.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Donor

A healthy person who contributes bone marrow for transplantation.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Donors with low iron levels cannot donate to protect their own health.
"A significant shortage in available potential kidney donors exists," said the study's lead author, Duane Baldwin.
World Marrow Donor Association is a global volunteer organisation of bone marrow donor records and umbilical cord blood banks, aiming at world co-operation in relation to having a more effective process of finding and delivering allogeneic bone marrow transplants.
ISLAMABAD -- A two-day national consultative workshop on Blood Donor Management organized by the World Health Organization and the Safe Blood Transfusion Programme (SBTP) concluded here on Wednesday.
SGF's signature Shared Donor Egg Program offers cost savings, access to a larger pool of donors, and a significant reduction in wait time to select a donor.
Fundraisers are increasingly finding they cannot gain meaningful net revenue from donors who give less than $15 on average.
Donors with ages ranging from 18-60 years who reported during one year to the blood bank were incorporated in this study.
All donors had been provided with educational material that described the donation process and were requested not to donate if they were at risk of infection with blood-borne pathogen.
The length of time a patient spends waiting for a kidney transplant is currently based on several different variables, including the length of time they have been on dialysis, if they have a high panel reactive antibody (PRA) level, if they have ever been a kidney donor to someone else, their age, and if they have a living donor.
Results show that donors had a average ambivalence score of 3, with only 7% of the study population reporting no ambivalence during the assessment.
Results: Of the 397 charts reviewed, 283 were from donors, 96 were from nondonors, and 18 were excluded from the analysis.
The SANBS screens Hb levels of all donors at each donation using the copper sulphate specific gravity method.