Don Juan

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Don Juan

(don-hwahn'),
In psychiatry, a term used to denote men with compulsive sexual or romantic overactivity, usually with a succession of female partners.
[legendary Spanish nobleman]

Don Juan

a legendary Spanish libertine cited in many works of literature as a seductive and sexually promiscuous man. See also satyriasis.

Don Juan

(don-hwahn', don jū'an)
psychiatry A term used to denote a man with compulsive sexual or romantic overactivity, usually with a succession of female partners.
[legendary Spanish nobleman]

Don Juan

[After the legendary, promiscuous Spanish nobleman, Don Juan de Tenorio]
A man who behaves in a sexually promiscuous manner. Some psychologists suggest this arises from insecurity concerning his masculinity or latent and unconscious homosexual preference.
References in periodicals archive ?
6) And so he does--De Rougemont goes so far as to say that A's interpretation of Don Juan rivals Mozart's in its magnificence.
A compares Moliere's Don Juan unfavorably to Mozart's Don Giovanni, on the grounds that, by being placed on stage, the former can only resort to seducing girls by promising to marry them, which, as a romantic expedient, is less than heroic: "To deceive a girl with a promise of marriage is a very inferior art, and because someone is small enough to do that, it certainly does not follow that he is great enough to be called Don Juan.
Let us bring to mind, for example, the plurality of meanings associated to Don Juan's myth: even when maintaining its essential features of transcendence, and the indissoluble connection between eros and thanatos, between the sacred and the secular, Don Juan has been read as a sinner and a criminal, as satanic, rebel, idealistic, as a romantic hero, constantly unfulfilled, as a homosexual, a jester, a seducer, etc.
Regarding Don Juan's myth, Jean Rousset, in his classic study Le mythe de Don Juan (1973), (6) isolates the invariant features that build the 'permanent Don Juan setting,' namely, hero, feminine group and death.
Since its origins in seventeenth-century Spain, the Don Juan myth has given rise to literary discourses of all genres and in literatures of many languages.
In the wake of modernism and taking as starting point the features which the character bears at the turn of the century--old age, paternity, repentance, melancholy--Valle-Inclan creates a decadent Don Juan in whom there are hardly any traces of the baroque burlador.
strictly heterosexual sex offender, Don Juan is a bad fit for
IN PETER HANDKE'S elegant vignette, Don Juan (erzahlt von ihm selbst), the classic figure of the title makes an unexpected visit to our century, offering a surprising and ironic view of his elusive character.
It might also have avoided the subsequent proliferation of Don Juans, literary and popular, that ensued as a consequence of the diverse possibilities inherent in such an unrepentant state of mind.
The curtain rises in Tirso's play on the royal palace in Naples as Don Juan is in the act of leaving Duchess Isabella, the Queen's lady-in-waiting, after having made to love to her.
Thus, the Dona Juana figures, on the whole, are not really authentic Don Juans since they are often the objects of seduction rather than the subjects, generally deceived and usually punished for their transgressions.
Jardiel's fascination with the figure of Don Juan was neither unique nor innovative.