Don Juan

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Don Juan

(don-hwahn'),
In psychiatry, a term used to denote men with compulsive sexual or romantic overactivity, usually with a succession of female partners.
[legendary Spanish nobleman]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Don Juan

(don-hwahn', don jū'an)
psychiatry A term used to denote a man with compulsive sexual or romantic overactivity, usually with a succession of female partners.
[legendary Spanish nobleman]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Don Juan

[After the legendary, promiscuous Spanish nobleman, Don Juan de Tenorio]
A man who behaves in a sexually promiscuous manner. Some psychologists suggest this arises from insecurity concerning his masculinity or latent and unconscious homosexual preference.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
In the wake of modernism and taking as starting point the features which the character bears at the turn of the century--old age, paternity, repentance, melancholy--Valle-Inclan creates a decadent Don Juan in whom there are hardly any traces of the baroque burlador.
Valle-Inclan himself states that, in the figure of Don Juan Manuel de Montenegro, he aims to renew "the Galician aspects to be found in the Don Juan legend." Insisting on the features which, in his eyes, are characteristic of Don Juan--"impiety, bullying, and women"--Valle-Inclan writes that "this last one, the Don Juan of women, is the Seville Don Juan, nostalgia of a harem.
to be left of Don Juan today is the Kierkegaardian neither/nor, that is,
strictly heterosexual sex offender, Don Juan is a bad fit for
IN PETER HANDKE'S elegant vignette, Don Juan (erzahlt von ihm selbst), the classic figure of the title makes an unexpected visit to our century, offering a surprising and ironic view of his elusive character.
The monkish narrator describes a reserved, mature, almost magical incarnation of Don Juan in the seven days before his arrival at Port Royal.
Thus, the Dona Juana figures, on the whole, are not really authentic Don Juans since they are often the objects of seduction rather than the subjects, generally deceived and usually punished for their transgressions.
In certain respects, I can say of Don Juan what Elvira says to him: "You murderer of my happiness"--for to tell the truth it is this piece which affected me so diabolically that I can never forget it; it was this piece which drove me, like Elvira, out of the cloister's quiet night.
Let us bring to mind, for example, the plurality of meanings associated to Don Juan's myth: even when maintaining its essential features of transcendence, and the indissoluble connection between eros and thanatos, between the sacred and the secular, Don Juan has been read as a sinner and a criminal, as satanic, rebel, idealistic, as a romantic hero, constantly unfulfilled, as a homosexual, a jester, a seducer, etc.; moreover, we cannot forget that, in each historical moment, these judgments have carried either a positive or a negative connotation, depending on the ideological positioning, the cultural space or the aesthetic movement of the time or who was judging.
Jardiel's fascination with the figure of Don Juan was neither unique nor innovative.
A character's refusal to change is typically accompanied by a condemnatory message, the most spectacular being Tirso's El burlador de Sevilla in which Don Juan's antisocial offenses provoke an exceptional instance of divine intervention.
against it, although the king opposes it, and although my father, angered, threatens to prevent it, your husband I must be." Don Juan expresses a romantic eagerness to wed despite the opposition of his family and king.