Don Juan

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Don Juan

(don-hwahn'),
In psychiatry, a term used to denote men with compulsive sexual or romantic overactivity, usually with a succession of female partners.
[legendary Spanish nobleman]

Don Juan

a legendary Spanish libertine cited in many works of literature as a seductive and sexually promiscuous man. See also satyriasis.

Don Juan

(don-hwahn', don jū'an)
psychiatry A term used to denote a man with compulsive sexual or romantic overactivity, usually with a succession of female partners.
[legendary Spanish nobleman]

Don Juan

[After the legendary, promiscuous Spanish nobleman, Don Juan de Tenorio]
A man who behaves in a sexually promiscuous manner. Some psychologists suggest this arises from insecurity concerning his masculinity or latent and unconscious homosexual preference.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mostly dressed in white, he delved deep into the cold, black heart of Don Giovanni with chilling effect.
Though the arias of love and pain are given full emotional loading, Talevi and Opera North are generally stronger on the "giacoso" than the "dramma" - you are hardly likely to see a funnier Don Giovanni.
Third and finally, A claims that Mozart's Don Giovanni "deserves the highest place among all the classic works" (13) because the theme of the opera is precisely the theme of the sensuous-erotic in its most refined form.
Continuing to entice women with his usual rapacity, Don Giovanni is haunted by the ghost of the murdered man and decides to invite him to dinner.
Microfonos en Bellas Artes, en Mozart, en Don Giovanni, grabaciones?
Vitek hires Jakub as the star of a production of Mozart s Don Giovanni - Don Juans- at the local opera house.
The action begins with a callous and brazen Don Giovanni from Jacques Imbrailo who gives a well sung and devilishly acted solid performance.
But I loved the full-blooded performances - William Dazeley as the dastardly Don Giovanni who philanders, so he claims, out of generosity to womanhood and Matthew Hargreaves as his long-suffering servant, Leporello.
Woodfield opens his book with Da Pontes account of the early Viennese reception of Don Giovanni which he uses to set up this theme.
Michael Grandage, the trendy British director of the Met's new Don Giovanni, offers no inappropriate innovations.
Two of my friends are coming to see Don Giovanni, and the WNO always gets fantastic support in Llandudno.