dominant

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dominant

 [dom´ĭ-nant]
1. exerting a ruling or controlling influence.
2. in genetics, capable of expression when carried by only one of a pair of homologous chromosomes; see dominant gene.
3. an allele or trait that has this characteristic.
dominant side the half of the body in which a person is stronger; writing and eating are usually done with the hand on the dominant side. See also handedness.

dom·i·nant

(dom'i-nănt),
1. Ruling or controlling.
2. In genetics, denoting an allele possessed by one of the parents of a hybrid that is expressed in the latter to the exclusion of a contrasting allele (the recessive) from the other parent.
[L. dominans, pres. p. of dominor, to rule, fr. dominus, lord, master, fr. domus, house]

dominant

(dŏm′ə-nənt)
adj.
1. Tending to be stronger than its counterpart or used for the most important tasks or in the most pressing situations: Which is your dominant eye? Throw the ball with your dominant arm.
2. Genetics Of, relating to, or being an allele that produces the same phenotypic effect in heterozygotes as in homozygotes.
3. Ecology Of, relating to, or being a species that is most characteristic of an ecological community and usually determines the presence, abundance, and type of other species.
n.
1. Genetics A dominant allele or a trait produced by a dominant allele.
2. Ecology A dominant species.

dom′i·nant·ly adv.

dominant

Genetics
noun A phenotype expressed when a particular gene is present in a cell, regardless of whether the allelic set contains 2 different forms of expression; the allele with the masked phenotype is termed recessive.
 
Autosomal dominant disorders
Achondroplasia, familial hypercholesterolemia, Huntington’s disease.

Sexology
adjective, noun Top; Referring to the person, or the person him- or herself, who takes the active or controlling role in a BDSM relationship, which contrasts to the submissive (bottom) position or role.

dominant

Genetics A phenotype expressed when a particular gene is present in a cell, regardless of whether the allelic set contains 2 different forms of expression; the allele with the masked phenotype is termed recessive Dominant disorders Achondroplasia, familial hypercholesterolemia, Huntington's disease. See Filial generation, Homozygote, Trait. Cf Recessive.

dom·i·nant

(dom'i-nănt)
1. Ruling or controlling.
2. genetics Denoting an allele possessed by one of the parents of a hybrid that is expressed in the latter to the exclusion of a contrasting allele (the recessive) from the other parent.
[L. dominans, pres. p. of dominor, to rule, fr. dominus, lord, master, fr. domus, house]

dominant

See DOMINANCE.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, the dominance indices of the original dominants (65.8% [+ or -] 42.4%) and original subordinates (45.8% [+ or -] 41.3%) were no longer significantly different (Wilcoxon signed-rank test: P = 0.209; Fig.
In these pairs, in which no intruder was added during P2, no rank reversals occurred, and the dominance indices of dominants remained significantly higher than in subordinates over all three periods (in P1, DOM = 97.1% [+ or -] 5.6%; SUB = 28.5% [+ or -] 14.5%; Wilcoxon signed-rank test: P [less than or equal to] 0.01; in P2, DOM = 100% [+ or -] 0%; SUB = 26.3% [+ or -] 19.6%; Wilcoxon signed-rank test: P [less than or equal to] 0.01; in P3, DOM = 95.3% [+ or -] 9.8%; SUB = 33.0% [+ or -] 18.5%; Wilcoxon signed-rank test: P [less than or equal to] 0.01; n = 14; Fig.
In P1, a dominance relationship was established; the dominance indices of the dominants (94.6% [+ or -] 6.5%, n = 14) were significantly higher than those of the subordinates (15.9% [+ or -] 13.6%, n = 14; Wilcoxon signed-rank test: P [less than or equal to] 0.01).
To better understand the behavioral patterns that promote rank reversals, we performed preliminary data analysis, quantifying aggressive and submissive acts displayed by dominants and subordinates in trials that did or did not lead to rank reversals (Table 1).
While dominants (10.8 [+ or -] 6.8) performed a significantly higher number of aggressive acts (approaches and attacks) than subordinates (4.4 [+ or -] 4.7) in non-reversal trials (Wilcoxon signed-rank test: P [less than or equal to] 0.01), there was no significant difference (Wilcoxon signed-rank test: P = 0.173) in the number of aggressive acts performed by the dominants (9.3 [+ or -] 6.2) and subordinates (5.7 [+ or -] 5.8) in reversal trials (Table 1).
Instead, for rank reversals to occur, the intruder has to be larger than both members of the original pair, which gives the intruder an agonistic advantage leading to defeats of both the dominants and subordinates.
Submissives and dominants alike commented on the role that dominants could play in motivating their submissives.
The dominants who mentioned this benefit tended to emphasize the relaxation that comes from having exerted oneself and the accompanying rush.
In direct opposition to the main benefit for dominants, the sole benefit consistently expressed as specific to submission was giving up control.
Once again, some of these were shared, while others were specific to submissives or to dominants. As a female submissive summarized, "It's hard for both parties and everyone has to work really hard and, you know, communicate very clearly to make things, make sure things don't go sour." Participants advised that "You have to practice caution and safety regardless of what your title is." Another commonly expressed sentiment was that the relative difficulty of either role depended upon whether or not it was the role one felt most comfortable assuming.
Submissives mentioned that although they want to give up their power, it can be difficult to have to do what their dominants command.
Similarly, what she called empowerment was mentioned by dominants in the categories of control or power, confidence, and freedom from day-to-day roles, but was not a theme for submissives.