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do·main

(dō-mān'),
1. Homologous unit of approximately 110-120 amino acids, groups of which make up the light and heavy chains of the immunoglobulin molecule; each serves a specific function. The light chain has two domains, one in the variable region and one in the constant region of the chain; the heavy chain has four to five domains, depending on the class of immunoglobulin, one in the variable region and the remaining ones in the constant region.
2. A region of a protein having some distinctive physical feature or role.
3. An independently folded, globular structure composed of one section of a polypeptide chain. A domain may interact with another domain; it may be associated with a particular function. Domains can vary in size.
[Fr. domaine, fr. L. dominium, property, dominion]

domain

/do·main/ (do-mān´) in immunology, any of the homology regions of heavy or light polypeptide chains of immunoglobulins.

domain

(dō-mān′)
n.
Biology Any of three primary divisions of organisms, consisting of the eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea, that rank above a kingdom in taxonomic systems based on similarities of DNA sequences.

domain

a region of a protein or polypeptide whose three-dimensional configuration enables it to interact specifically with particular receptors, enzymes, or other proteins.

domain

EBM
Any of a collection of observations with a topic-specific commonality about each subject in a clinical trial, which the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) divides into different classes:
• Interventions class;
• Events class;
• Findings class.

do·main

(dō-mān')
1. Homologous unit of 110-120 amino acids, groups of which make up the light and heavy chains of the immunoglobulin molecule; each serves a specific function. The light chain has two domains, one in the variable region and one in the constant region of the chain; the heavy chain has four to five domains, depending on the class of immunoglobulin, one in the variable region and the remaining ones in the constant region.
2. A region of a protein having some distinctive physical feature or role.
3. An independently folded, globular structure composed of one section of a polypeptide chain. A domain may interact with another domain; it may be associated with a particular function. Domains can vary in size.
[Fr. domaine, fr. L. dominium, property, dominion]

domain

1. Of a protein, a discrete length of the amino acid sequence that is known to be associated with a specific function.
2. Of a chromosome, a region in which supercoiling occurs independently of other domains; or a region that includes a gene of raised sensitivity to degradation by DNASE I.

domain

  1. a structurally or functionally distinct part of a PROTEIN.
  2. any of three primary groupings (‘superkingdoms’): ARCHAEA, BACTERIA or EUCARYA, into which all ORGANISMS are placed in modern CLASSIFICATIONS based on genetic structures and sequences.

domain

1. region of a protein with a characteristic tertiary structure and function; homologous domains may occur on different proteins.
2. regions of the heavy chain of immunoglobulins. See cH domain, cL domain.

transmembrane domain
for any membrane-bound protein or glycoprotein, those amino acid sequences that traverse and are present in the cell membrane. In receptor biology, transmembrane domains are distinguished from the extracellular ligand binding domains, cytoplasmic domains, and from immunological domains.

Patient discussion about domain

Q. What other illnesses are similar to asthma? I am 45 years old. My doctor suspects I might have adult asthma but there has yet been a final diagnosis made. What other problems might this be?

A. Before diagnosing someone as asthmatic, alternative possibilities should be considered. A clinician taking a history should check whether the patient is using any known bronchoconstrictors (substances that cause narrowing of the airways, e.g., certain anti-inflammatory agents or beta-blockers). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which closely resembles asthma, is correlated with more exposure to cigarette smoke, an older patient, and decreased likelihood of family history of atopy. Your physician should examine these possibilities as well before diagnosing.

More discussions about domain
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