dolorimeter


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dolorimeter

 [do″lor-im´ĕ-ter]
an instrument for measuring pain in dols; see also algesimeter.

dolorimeter

(dō″lor-ĭm′ĭ-tĕr) [″ + Gr. metron, measure]
A device that applies pressure evenly and reproducibly to a body part; it can be used to measure a patient's pain tolerance (e.g., in arthritis or fibromyalgia).
References in periodicals archive ?
The pressure dolorimeter is connected to a tip-type pressure sensor of a hand stimulator.
In the pressure dolorimeter test, the rat was placed in a restraining chamber with no anesthetic, as shown in Figure 2(c).
As a means to stimulate the pain threshold to pressure, it was used a dolorimeter, (Kratos [R]), with tapered extremity and able to produce pressure up to 50 kgf.
The evaluation with the cold started immediately after the intervention with the dolorimeter of pressure, the volunteers immersed the right upper limb (up to the elbow articular interline) in the water at 5[degrees]C for 30 seconds, and it was registered the exact time when the individuals reported their painful thresholds, that is, when it was mentioned the word 'pain' by the volunteers.
In 1951, the "Hardy-Wolff-Goodell dolorimeter" was used for the first time on patients in an attempt to assess the effectiveness of analgesia during labour.
Two years later, a group of anaesthetists evaluated the dolorimeter as an instrument for assessing pain, principally in pain clinic patients.
Experimental pain was induced by means of the Portable Electronic Dolorimeter (Dolorimetro Electronico Portatil: DEP)[R].
(1) In the 1990 ACR criteria, tender points were defined as a complaint of pain (or any more dramatic response) when an examiner applied 4 kg of pressure with the pulp of the thumb or first two or three fingers, calibrated with a dolorimeter (a device that can measure the amount and rate of pressure applied over a specified surface area).
The use of a dolorimeter is helpful to objectify the tender point findings.
Use of a dolorimeter assists to distribute pressure equally over a discrete point, which is more objective (Freundlich & Leventhal, 1993).
arguments are settled by those whose dolorimeters run cold.
Control and "fibrositic" tenderness; comparison of two dolorimeters. J Rheumatol.