guide dog

(redirected from Dog Guide)
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guide dog

n.
A dog that has been specially trained to guide a blind or visually impaired person.

guide dog

A dog specifically trained to assist blind or partially sighted persons with mobility.
References in periodicals archive ?
Regarding dog guides, respondents noted a lack of an appropriate place to put their dogs when staying at hotels.
The data were analyzed using the SPSS log-linear model selection program with test site (campus midblock, roundabout entry lane, roundabout exit lane, downtown TWSC), pedestrian condition (long cane, dog guide, no cane or dog), and trial outcome (vehicle yielded or not) as variables.
Guide dogs (or dog guides, which is considered to be more politically correct) aren't found at the local kennel, but they might be found next-door.
Within the category of questions about working dogs and organizations, Elizabeth asked what could happen if someone brought a dog guide into a restaurant and were told to leave.
All Australasian dog guide providers are members of the International Guide Dog Federation, which has clearly defined standards of service for member agencies (IGDF, 2013).
Over the past several decades, dog guide schools began to be able to rely on applicants to have received O&M services prior to enrolling in dog guide training.
Despite the additional information provided by the electronic travel aids, the participants stressed that it is important to stay alert and to be attentive to the layout of the route, which they had to explore with the assistance of a dog guide or long cane, and the course and texture of foot and cycle paths, roads, intersections, and crosswalks.
Attacks on dog guides by other dogs remain a troubling issue that is being addressed by dog guide schools and communities of dog guide users.
In 2010, 1,073 dog guides were working in Japan (National Federation of All Japan Guide Dog Training Institutions, 2010), but dog guide users are still confused about how to cope with social barriers when using dogs for mobility.
Leader Dogs for the Blind, the fist dog guide organization to provide global positioning system (GPS) device training to people using a cane or a dog guide for mobility, recently began selling its own personal GPS navigational device.
Due out in August 2011, a new biography offers a moment-by-moment account of a man who is blind and his dog guide who escaped the World Trade Center after the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack.
Developed by the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) and Ambutech, a "mobility product" manufacturer, the glasses are meant to be used as a secondary mobility device (that is, used in addition to a white cane or dog guide).