anamnesis

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anamnesis

 [an″am-ne´sis] (Gr.)
1. recollection.
2. a medical or psychiatric patient case history, particularly using the patient's recollections. Compare catamnesis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

an·am·ne·sis

(an'am-nē'sis),
1. The act of remembering.
2. The medical or developmental history of a patient.
[G. anamnēsis, recollection]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

an·am·ne·sis

(an'am-nē'sis)
1. The act of remembering.
2. The medical or developmental history of a patient.
[G. anamnēsis, recollection]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

anamnesis

The complete clinical case history of a patient. From the Greek anamnesis , a reminiscence.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

an·am·ne·sis

(an'am-nē'sis)
1. The act of remembering.
2. The medical or developmental history of a patient.
[G. anamnēsis, recollection]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
However much or little of the doctrine of recollection Plato/Socrates means us to take seriously, it really does not resolve the learner's paradox in any very satisfactory way.
Once more, without canvassing the scholarly literature, it is certainly true that the doctrine of recollection has had more sympathetic evaluations among scholars such as W.
I think it is fair to conclude that, although Plato never really doubts that knowledge of reality is, somehow or other, possible to uncover by means of dialectical discussion, the doctrine of recollection does not explain how.
The earlier passage, like 86b7, immediately follows a recapitulation of the doctrine of recollection, which I take to be circumstantial evidence in both cases that Plato recognizes that recollection will not answer his critics.

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