creationism

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creationism

(krē-ā′shə-nĭz′əm)
n.
Belief in the supernatural origin of the universe or of humans and other living things, especially as based on the literal interpretation of the account of the creation related in the Bible.

cre·a′tion·ist adj. & n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

creationism

Evolutionary biology
A philosophy based on the Judeo-Christian concept that all forms of life, in particular human life, were created from nothing (by God). Creationism is the virtual opposite of Darwinism or evolution, in which all organisms are believed to have evolved from another.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

creationism

The belief that the account of the creation of the world contained in the first chapter of the book of Genesis is literally true. The implication, often expressed, is that the scientific account, including the geological evidence, is false. Creationism denies Darwinian evolution, but a belief in, and knowledge of, evolution has become an essential component in the mental armamentarium of the medical scientist. (See EVOLUTIONARY MEDICINE.)
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

creationism

an old-fashioned and outdated doctrine that each species of organism arose in an independent fashion by special creation. Such views have now been largely replaced by evolutionary theory but are still held by some on religious grounds.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Creation Project aims to recover the grand themes of the doctrine of creation and to articulate them in a way that is faithful to revealed truth and in open and earnest dialogue with modern science.
There are some theologians and philosophers today, working within the Christian tradition, who deny the doctrine of creation out-of-nothing.
(25) Though this passage does not explicitly say that Aristotle taught the doctrine of creation, it is very difficult to see how an efficient, exemplar, and final cause that produces the matter and form of all things could not be a creator, especially when this is exactly how Aquinas describes God as a creator in Summa Theologiae I, q.
It understands the doctrine of creation not to be primarily about God's power, but about God's love: how we can live together, all of us, within and for God's body.
Like Aquinas, Young adopts Aristotelian epistemology to accommodate the doctrine of creation in revealed theology.
However, instead of being a cause of environmental problems, the Hebrew creation accounts (in Gen.) can provide theological foundations for an environmentally relevant missiology and ethic, Contrary to what White contends, I submit that reclaiming the creation tradition of the Bible, and returning to the doctrine of creation as expounded in the biblical narratives, will help Christian theology and missiology to be liberated from the captivity of anthropocentrism, which contributes to thinking and projects insensitive to the environment.
These two doctrines, after the doctrine of creation, define the essence or substance of Christian faith.
The Christian doctrine of creation is an important part of the theological framework for economics, leading us to a proper assessment of human beings, and their creative potential.
My worry is creationism can end up reducing the doctrine of creation rather than enhancing it.
Marshall Boswell investigates how this tetralogy has been constructed on the principles of Kirkegaard's irony, as well as by applying the Barthian doctrine of creation "out of nothing" (see Boswell, John Updike's Rabbit Tetralogy: Mastered Irony in Motion, U of Missouri P, 2001 17).
whereas here I supply many of my needs from this place by my work and am responsible besides for the care of the place." Wendell Berry has written voluminously on what the Christian church calls the doctrine of creation yet only sparingly, albeit with considerable feeling, about another of the church's doctrines, that of the incarnation.