Dock


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Dock

 [dok]
Lavinia Lloyd (1858–1956). American pioneer in public health nursing. Beginning with her work with the United Workers of Norwich, Connecticut, she made valuable contributions to public health nursing, including work with Lillian wald at the Henry Street Settlement in New York. In addition, she was active in the women's suffrage movement and an advocate of legislative control of nursing practice. She was also a prolific author; her works include Materia Medica for Nurses, one of the earliest nursing textbooks, and a four-volume History of Nursing, written with Adelaide nutting.
 Lavinia Lloyd Dock. Special collections, Milbank Memorial Library, Teachers College, Columbia University.

dock

(dŏk)
n.
1. The solid or fleshy part of an animal's tail.
2. The tail of an animal after it has been bobbed or clipped.
tr.v. docked, docking, docks
To clip short or cut off (an animal's tail, for example).

Dock, Lavinia Lloyd

an American public health nurse. A graduate of the Bellevue Hospital Training School for Nurses in New York in 1886, she started a visiting nurse service in Norwalk, Connecticut. She then joined the New York City Mission before becoming an assistant to Isabel Hampton Robb at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. She returned to public health nursing when she joined the Henry Street Settlement in New York to work with Lillian Wald. She advocated an international public health movement and the improvement of education for nurses. With M. Adelaide Nutting, she wrote History of Nursing, a classic in nursing literature.
References in classic literature ?
Granet swung the car around into the archway of a hotel exactly opposite the dock.
Here's the docks for your steamers, and here's the railroads.
A French barque was lyin' alongside the dock an' I spoke tull the captun, askun' hum what he would charge when work for the day was done, tull haul clear for a couple o' hours an' let me un.
Katherine's Dock House is vast in extent and confusing in its plan.
Monsieur Robert Darzac stood in the prisoner's dock between policemen, tall, handsome, and calm.
And commissions and remembrances do so crowd upon one at such a time, that we were still busied with this employment when we found ourselves fused, as it were, into a dense conglomeration of passengers and passengers' friends and passengers' luggage, all jumbled together on the deck of a small steamboat, and panting and snorting off to the packet, which had worked out of dock yesterday afternoon and was now lying at her moorings in the river.
There were only a couple of women in the dock, who were nodding to their admiring friends, while the clerk read some depositions to a couple of policemen and a man in plain clothes who leant over the table.
When we got into dock we had lost our turn for loading, and they hauled us off to a tier where we remained for a month.
Moving on, I at last came to a dim sort of light not far from the docks, and heard a forlorn creaking in the air; and looking up, saw a swinging sign over the door with a white painting upon it, faintly representing a tall straight jet of misty spray, and these words underneath -- The Spouter-Inn: --Peter Coffin.
When two large, loaded Indiamen chance to crowd and crush towards each other in the docks, what do the sailors do?
As for the wonders of Bombay its famous city hall, its splendid library, its forts and docks, its bazaars, mosques, synagogues, its Armenian churches, and the noble pagoda on Malabar Hill, with its two polygonal towers-- he cared not a straw to see them.
Few Chinamen about the Docks, and fewer Lascars, and no ships coming in, these say