Dix-Hallpike maneuver

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Dix-Hall·pike maneuver

(diks hal'pīk),
test for eliciting paroxysmal vertigo and nystagmus in which the patient is brought from the sitting to the supine position with the head hanging over the examining table and turned to the right or left; vertigo and nystagmus are elicited when the head is rotated toward the affected ear.

Dix-Hall·pike ma·neu·ver

(diks-hawl'pīk mă-nū'vĕr)
Test for eliciting paroxysmal vertigo and nystagmus in which the patient is brought from the sitting to the supine position with the head hanging over the examining table and turned to the right or left; vertigo and nystagmus are elicited when the head is rotated toward the affected ear.
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We performed the positioning nystagmus test (Dix-Hallpike test) for the diagnosis to BPPV.
In case of a negative Dix-Hallpike test or a supine head roll test on videonystagmography, the patient was considered completely resolved and was scheduled for follow-up at the 1-week follow-up point.
Perform a complete neurologic examination in patients who clearly do not have a history of orthostatic hypotension and who have a Dix-Hallpike test that is negative or not indicated.
The short-term success for the complete resolution of symptoms and the conversion of the Dix-Hallpike test from a positive to a negative after one CRM treatment session ranges from 34% to 89% (8-11).
The Dix-Hallpike test and roll test were negative as was head-shaking test.
The diagnosis of BPPV is confirmed based on patient history and provocation maneuvers, such as the Dix-Hallpike test or the supine head-turning test.
Inclusion criterion was a history of short-lasting (<60 s), positive Dix-Hallpike test using Frenzel glasses (vertigo provoked by head position changes relative to gravity).
Patients of both genders with age between 30 to 70 years with no hearing loss and diagnosed as having benign paroxysmal positional vertigo diagnosed by Dix-Hallpike test were included in this study.
Once the offending labyrinth is identified on Dix-Hallpike test, PC-BPPV is treated using particle repositioning manoeuvre--that is Epley's manoeuvre.
No nystagmus was evoked by positional maneuvers or the Dix-Hallpike test. Audiometry demonstrated normal hearing.
The Dix-Hallpike test should be performed on all dizzy patients, whether symptomatic or not.