disulfide bond

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bond

 [bond]
the linkage between atoms or radicals of a chemical compound, or the symbol representing this linkage and indicating the number and attachment of the valencies of an atom in constitutional formulas, represented by a pair of dots or a line between atoms, e.g., H—O—H, H—C≡C—H or H:O:H, H:C:::C:H.
coordinate covalent bond a covalent bond in which one of the bonded atoms furnishes both of the shared electrons.
covalent bond a chemical bond between two atoms or radicals formed by the sharing of a pair (single bond), two pairs (double bond), or three pairs of electrons (triple bond).
disulfide bond a strong covalent bond, —S—S—, important in linking polypeptide chains in proteins, the linkage arising as a result of the oxidation of the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of two molecules of cysteine.
high-energy phosphate bond an energy-rich phosphate linkage present in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphocreatine, and certain other biological molecules. On hydrolysis at pH 7 it yields about 8000 calories per mole, in contrast to the 3000 calories yielded by phosphate esters. The bond stores energy that is used to drive biochemical processes, such as the synthesis of macromolecules, contraction of muscles, and the production of the electrical potentials for nerve conduction.
high-energy sulfur bond an energy-rich sulfur linkage, the most important of which occurs in the acetyl-CoA molecule, the main source of energy in fatty acid biosynthesis.
hydrogen bond a weak, primarily electrostatic, bond between a hydrogen atom bound to a highly electronegative element (such as oxygen or nitrogen) in a given molecule, or part of a molecule, and a second highly electronegative atom in another molecule or in a different part of the same molecule.
ionic bond a chemical bond in which electrons are transferred from one atom to another so that one bears a positive and the other a negative charge, the attraction between these opposite charges forming the bond.
peptide bond the —CO—NH— linkage formed between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another; it is an amide linkage joining amino acids to form peptides.

di·sul·fide bond

a single bond between two sulfurs; specifically, the -S-S- link binding two peptide chains (or different parts of one peptide chain); also occurs as part of the molecule of the amino acid, cystine, and is important as a structural determinant in many peptide and protein molecules, for example, keratin, insulin, and oxytocin. A symmetric disulfide is R-S-S-R; R'-S-S-R is a mixed or asymmetric disulfide.

di·sul·fide bond

(dī-sŭl'fīd bond)
A single bond between two sulfurs; specifically, the -S-S- link binding two peptide chains (or different parts of one peptide chain).
Synonym(s): disulphide bond.

bond

the linkage between atoms or radicals of a chemical compound, or the symbol representing this linkage and indicating the number and attachment of the valencies of an atom in constitutional formulas, e.g. H−O−H, H−C= C−H and can be represented by a pair of dots between atoms, e.g. H:O:H, H:C:::C:H.

coordinate covalent bond
a covalent bond in which one of the bonded atoms furnishes both of the shared electrons.
covalent bond
a chemical bond between two atoms or radicals formed by the sharing of a pair (single bond), two pairs (double bond) or three pairs of electrons (triple bond).
disulfide bond
a strong covalent bond, −S−S−, important in linking polypeptide chains in proteins, the linkage arising as a result of the oxidation of the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of two molecules of cysteine.
high-energy phosphate bond
an energy-rich phosphate linkage present in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphocreatine and certain other biological molecules. On hydrolysis at pH 7 it yields about 8000 calories per mole, in contrast to the 3000 calories yielded by phosphate esters. The bond stores energy that is used to drive biochemical processes, such as the synthesis of macromolecules, contraction of muscles, and the production of the electrical potentials for nerve conduction.
high-energy sulfur bond
an energy-rich sulfur linkage, the most important of which occurs in the acetyl-CoA molecule, the main source of energy in fatty acid biosynthesis.
human-animal bond
the psychological interdependence between humans and companion animals.
hydrogen bond
a weak, primarily electrostatic, bond between a hydrogen atom bound to a highly electronegative element (such as oxygen or nitrogen) in a given molecule, or part of a molecule, and a second highly electronegative atom in another molecule or in a different part of the same molecule.
ionic bond
a chemical bond in which electrons are transferred from one atom to another so that one bears a positive and the other a negative charge, the attraction between these opposite charges forming the bond.
peptide bond
the −CO−NH− linkage formed between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another; it is an amide linkage joining amino acids to form peptides.
phosphoanhydride bond
a high energy bond present in ATP.
phosphodiester bond
links between nucleotides in nucleic acids.
References in periodicals archive ?
47) It was also hypothesized that a disulphide bond between Cys553 and Cys558 is cleaved by reducing agents such as dithiothreitol or that the antioxidant thioredoxin applied from the extracellular side induces opening of the TRPC5 channel.
However, the parameters of electro-philicity and redox potential strongly correlate with the electron density of the disulphide bond, suggesting that redox potential is a useful reference to quantify the reactivity of reactive disulphides to a Cys group or, in other words, the sensitivity of TRP channels to oxidative Cys modification.
2] may generate an unstable oxidized Cys product, which may turn into a more stable disulphide bond, while cinnamaldehyde and NMM immediately form stable Michael addition adducts.
Intracellular folding of the glycoprotein affects sequon occupancy as shown when t-PA is expressed under mild conditions of reducing agent dithiothreitol to prevent disulphide bond formation in the ER.
Structural analysis of the CD2 T lymphocyte antigen by site-directed mutagenesis to introduce a disulphide bond into domain 1.
In short, disulphide bonds were first reduced to form-free functional thiol groups with sodium borohydride.
Disulphide bonds remain unaffected, so the process is reversible, and the hair curl returns to normal in about 3 months.
4, lane 6) and patients S1 - 3 after treatment to reduce the disulphide bonds of the mucin.
Reduction of the disulphide bonds has in some cases generated oligomers apparently joined by a novel reduction-insensitive bond that required treatment with trypsin for solubilisation.
Section Titles: Genetics and Quality Correlations; Biotechnology; Gluten Protein Analysis, Purification and Characterization; Disulphide Bonds and Redox Reactions; Improvers and Enzymic Modification; Quality Testing, Non-Food Uses; Viscoelasticity, Rheology and Mixing; Gluten Protein Synthesis during Grain Development and Effects of Nutrition and Environment; Non-Gluten Components