distributive justice


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distributive justice

(dis-trib′yŭ-tiv)
The ethical concept that favors the value of doing some good for a community, as opposed to doing great good for an individual. It may be illustrated by the dilemma of providing a costly organ transplant to save the life of one person versus providing vaccination against polio to thousands of others. When monetary resources are limited, health care planners, providers, and patients compete for those resources and must decide whether to concentrate them on a single major task or distribute them broadly to the population at large.
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In another meta-analysis, Cohen-Charash and Spector (2001) found job satisfaction was more highly correlated with distributive justice than procedural or interactional justice.
Literature has shown that in spite of the induction of procedural and interactional justice, experiences and perceptions related to distributive justice continue to be negative on in the performance assessment practice context.
Distributive justice, procedural justice, interactional justice, gender differences, gender role theory, subordinate / supervisor dyads
Major organization : THE ISRAELI ASSOCIATION FOR DISTRIBUTIVE JUSTICE
Monopolizing conduct is understood to be bad both because it is presumptively economically inefficient and because, from any plausible conception of distributive justice, it is unjust.
They describe the principle of justice in the form of a 'general approach' to the questions on social justice and specifically distributive justice in healthcare.
Among various justice domains, we focused on distributive justice because the specific work-related dimensions of social comparison we examined in this paper (e.
Within the libertarian theory of distributive justice he prefers, distributions may--and often will--be unequal, but that inequality is just--and often desirable--when it results from basic principles of acquisition and transfer.
Georges Enderle makes the strong claim that the option for the poor and business ethics need each other, and his detailed tables and statistics prove that the global economic system should be reexamined in light of principles of distributive justice (44).
Autonomy and distributive justice were selected as proxies for transformational and transactional leadership.