distribution

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distribution

 [dis″trĭ-bu´shun]
1. the specific location or arrangement of continuing or successive objects or events in space or time.
2. the extent of a ramifying structure such as an artery or nerve and its branches.
3. the geographical range of an organism or disease.
frequency distribution in statistics, a mathematical function that describes the distribution of measurements on a scale for a specific population.
normal distribution a symmetrical distribution of scores with the majority concentrated around the mean; for example, that representing a large number of independent random events. It is in the shape of a bell-shaped curve. Called also gaussian distribution. See illustration.
 Normal distribution. The approximate percentage of the area (or frequency) lying under the curve between standard deviations is indicated. From Dorland's, 2000.
probability distribution a mathematical function that assigns to each measurable event in a sample group the probability that the event will occur.

dis·tri·bu·tion

(dis'tri-byū'shŭn),
1. The passage of the branches of arteries or nerves to the tissues and organs.
2. The area in which the branches of an artery or a nerve terminate, or the area supplied by such an artery or nerve.
3. The relative numbers of people in each of various categories or populations such as in different age, gender, or occupational samples.
4. Partition.
5. The pattern of occurrence of a substance within or between organelles, cells, tissues, organisms, or taxa.
[L. distribuo, pp. -tributus, to distribute, fr. tribus, a tribe]

distribution

(dĭs′trə-byo͞o′shən)
n.
1. The extension of the branches of arteries or nerves to the tissues and organs.
2. The area in which the branches of an artery or a nerve terminate, or the area supplied by such an artery or nerve.
3. The geographic occurrence or range of an organism.
4. A characterization of the occurrence of the actual unique values in a set of data (as in a frequency distribution) or of the theoretical unique values of a random variable (as in a probability distribution).

dis′tri·bu′tion·al adj.

distribution

Medspeak
The location or site of predilecton of a lesion or process.

Pharmacology
The reversible transfer of a drug from one site to another in the body.
 
Statistics
A group of ordered values; the frequencies or relative frequencies of all possible values of a characteristic.

distribution

Clinical medicine The pattern of involvement of a tissue by a particular condition. See Batwing distribution, Fat distribution, Mocassin distribution, Stocking & glove distribution Epidemiology The frequency and pattern of health-related characteristics and events in a population Pharmacology The location–eg intravascular or extravascular of a therapeutic agent after absorption, which corresponds to the sum of its distribution and elimination; disposition includes both the alpha and beta portions of a declining serum dose concentration versus time curve. See Disposition, Elimination.

dis·tri·bu·tion

(dis'tri-byū'shŭn)
1. The passage of the branches of arteries or nerves to the tissues and organs.
2. The area in which the branches of an artery or a nerve terminate, or the area supplied by such an artery or nerve.
3. Passage of an agent through blood or lymph to body sites remote from the site(s) of contact and absorption; thus called systemic distribution.
4. The relative numbers of people in each of various categories or populations, such as in different age, sex, or occupational samples.
5. The pattern of occurrence of a substance within or between cells, tissues, organisms, or taxa.
[L. dis-tribuo, pp. -tributus, to distribute, fr. tribus, a tribe]

distribution

the occurrence of a species over the total area in which it occurs, i.e. its range or geographical distribution. In aquatic organisms or soil organisms, or even organisms living on mountains, vertical distribution is also important. In some organisms vertical distribution may vary seasonally, as does geographical distribution, particularly in migratory forms. See also FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTION, DISPERSION.

dis·tri·bu·tion

(dis'tri-byū'shŭn)
1. Passage of branches of arteries or nerves to tissues and organs.
2. Area in which branches of an artery or a nerve terminate or area supplied by such artery or nerve.
[L. dis-tribuo, pp. -tributus, to distribute, fr. tribus, a tribe]
References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords: Weibull distribution, Double Weibull Distribution, Maximum Likelihood, Skewness, Moments and Methematica.
These examples help illustrate potential pitfalls in dealing with distributions from Sec.
Rather, ENM can achieve fine-scale resolution of distributions limited only by the spatial precision of the input occurrence data and the input environmental datasets.
Their required minimum distributions (RMDs) are taxed anyway, so a QCD may substitute for some other charitable contribution they would otherwise make.
The pdfs of standardized stable distributions are unimodal with shape depending on the parameters [beta] and [alpha].
Under section 409A, distributions of amounts deferred under a nonqualified deferred compensation plan may occur only for the following reasons:
The stochastic process produces a very broad distribution of potential lifetimes as shown in "Lifetime Possibilities" (page 102).
First, determine the mutual fund's intended distribution date and approximate payout by calling the fund's customer service 800 number (on your statement).
Graphing of the CHI Sq'd values is a way to monitor how well a supplier is meeting the required screen distribution. To gain confidence in this one descriptive number, it is suggested that the "major" screens also be graphed for a period of time.
Although the incidence of human tularemia is rare in the United States, the distribution of the pathogen appears ubiquitous (8).
The tax code uses shareholder basis in an S corporation to determine the deductibility of flow-through losses, the tax consequences of corporate distributions and gain on the sale of the stock.

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