distillation

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distillation

 [dis″tĭ-la´shun]
the process of vaporizing and condensing a substance to purify it or to separate a volatile substance from less volatile substances. Called also vaporization.
fractional distillation separation of volatilizable substances into a number of fractions, based on their different boiling points.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dis·til·la·tion

(dis'ti-lā'shŭn),
Volatilization of a liquid by heat and subsequent condensation of the vapor; a means of separating the volatile from the nonvolatile, or the more volatile from the less volatile, part of a liquid mixture.
[L. de-(di-)stillo, pp. -atus, to drop down]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

distillation

Aromatherapy
The process of vapourising a liquid by heat, condensing it at a cooler temperature and collecting the condensate; distillation serves to remove volatile impurities or undesired products, or to concentrate a volatile substance of interest.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

dis·til·la·tion

(dis'ti-lā'shŭn)
Volatilization of a liquid by heat and subsequent condensation of the vapor; in a liquid mixture, a means of separating the volatile from the nonvolatile, or the more volatile from the less volatile part.
[L. de-(di-)stillo, pp. -atus, to drop down]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dis·til·la·tion

(dis'ti-lā'shŭn)
Volatilization of a liquid by heat and subsequent condensation of the vapor.
[L. de-(di-)stillo, pp. -atus, to drop down]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Hewitt writes, "Chemical processes in general and distillation processes in particular account for a significant fraction of the world's energy usage.
The result is a flavour--and ultimately a beverage--that consumers will identify as being "true" to the real fruit, without the off-flavours often associated with distillation processes requiring heat.
According to ConsumerLab.com, the lack of contaminants in the fish oil supplements tested may be explained by the fact that most of the mercury in fish is found in the meat and not the oil; the species of fish used to make supplements are typically not those that are likely to accumulate mercury; and distillation processes used in making supplements help remove contaminants.