dissociative identity disorder

(redirected from Dissociative identity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

dissociative identity disorder

 
a type of dissociative disorder in which more than one personality exists in the same individual. Each personality has unique memories, characteristic behaviors, and social relationships that determine the individual's actions when that personality is dominant; the various personalities are usually very different from one another and may even seem to be opposites. At least two of the personalities control the patient's behavior in turns, with the transition from one personality to another often being abrupt. The host personality is usually totally unaware of the alternate personalities and experiences only gaps of time when the others are in control as well as inability to recall important personal information. Called also multiple personality disorder

dissociative identity disorder

1. a disorder in which two or more distinct conscious personalities alternately prevail in the same person, sometimes without any one personality being aware of the other(s).
2. a DSM diagnosis that is established when the specified criteria are met.

dissociative identity disorder

dissociative identity disorder

Multiple personality disorder The “presence of 2 or more distinct identities or personality states…that recurrently take control of behavior.” DID is accompanied by an inability to recall important personal information that exceeds ordinary forgetfulness; there are ±20,000 DIDs in the US

dis·so·ci·a·tive i·den·ti·ty dis·or·der

(di-sō'sē-ă-tiv ī-den'ti-tē dis-ōr'dĕr)
A disorder in which two or more distinct conscious personalities alternately prevail in the same person, sometimes without any one personality being aware of the other(s).

Dissociative identity disorder (DID)

Term that replaced Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD). A condition in which two or more distinctive identities or personality states alternate in controlling a person's consciousness and behavior.
References in periodicals archive ?
If someone with dissociative identity disorder (DID) commits a wrongful act, is he responsible?
Kim was diagnosed with dissociative identity disorder 15 years ago after being referred to mental health services, aged 14, due to memory lapses and erratic behaviour.
We are pleased to present five articles on topics ranging from a Jungian perspective of Dissociative Identity Disorder to the journey from separation consciousness to God consciousness.
People who claim more than one psychological identity are considered to be suffering from dissociative identity disorder.
Most frequent ones among those diagnoses are "borderline personality disorder," "somatization disorder," and "dissociative identity disorder" (5,17).
The disturbance is not better explained by dissociative identity disorder, posttraumatic stress, acute stress disorder, somatic symptom disorder, or major or mild neurocognitive disorder.
Dissociation is clinically seen in different forms, such as dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, dissociative identity, derealization, and depersonalization (1).
Mai suffers from "dissociative identity disorder" (236), and the voice of her alter ego, Bao, enters the second half of the novel.
The latter of these is also the more fraught with complications and potential danger, both psychic and physical, Jaclyn Blackstone, a 36-year-old woman living in Berkeley thought to suffer from apparent "dissociative identity personality disorder.
"Norman Bates is different in that he was formed more by his life," she says, explaining that "the specific disorder with Norman is dissociative identity disorder.