friction

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friction

 [frik´shun]
the act of rubbing.

fric·tion

(frik'shŭn),
1. The act of rubbing the surface of an object against that of another.
2. The force required for relative motion of two bodies that are in contact.
[L. frictio, fr. frico, to rub]

friction

A soft tissue massage technique, which entails the use of small circular pressure strokes from the fingertips, thumb pads and palms, with the intent of mobilising stiff joints and enhancing the circulation of blood to tendons and ligaments.

fric·tion

(frik'shŭn)
1. The act of rubbing the surface of an object against that of another; especially rubbing the limbs of the body to aid the circulation.
2. The force required for relative motion of two bodies that are in contact.
3. A group of movements in massage intended to move superficial layers over deeper structures, to reach deeper tissues, or to create heat. Includes static, cross-fiber, with-fiber, and circular frictions.
[L. frictio, fr. frico, to rub]

fric·tion

(frik'shŭn)
1. The act of rubbing the surface of an object against that of another; especially rubbing the limbs of the body to aid the circulation.
2. The force required for relative motion of two bodies that are in contact.
[L. frictio, fr. frico, to rub]
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the dissipated energy of both fingers is expected to be lower during movements without pinching or without a counteracting cosmetic glove.
The cumulative dissipated energy in damage processes, obtained by integrating [F.sub.r] over x, that is to say DE, is considered an appropriate parameter for characterizing low-cycle fatigue damage in RC components and is used for well-established RC damage indices [17].
Especially, the disturbance caused by an applied force in the DSC model is defined by dissipated energy. A procedure for back-calculation is developed based on the incremental integration method as well.
As shown in Figure 4, the critical input energy [U.sub.p] and the dissipated energy [U.sup.d.sub.p] show a clear exponential relationship: as the water content increases, and the critical elastic energy [U.sup.e.sub.p] decreases linearly.
However, the hysteresis loop area is only the dissipated energy of one loading-unloading cycle (the dissipated energy within the rebound strain) [29].
Similar to the derivation of the previous cross-section stiffness formulations, the variation of the dissipated energy of the cross-section in terms of the strains [[gamma].sub.11] and [[gamma].sub.12] can be modeled as follows:
Wear analysis in fretting of hard coatings through a dissipated energy concept, Wear 203-204: 393-403.
Among specific topics are the cyclic stability and fatigue performance of ultrafine-grained interstitial-free steel under mean stress, the cyclic depth-sensing indentation of gold wire, direct comparisons of fatigue behavior in bulk-metallic glasses and crystalline alloys, and a dissipated energy approach to fatigue crack growth in ductile solids and layered materials.
The pendulum is returned, having dissipated energy during the impact, and the degree of return is captured and displayed as a percentage of the original height.
The energy in the rocks of underground mining includes the stored elastic energy and the dissipated energy produced by the loading/unloading process [1].