sanitary napkin

(redirected from Disposable pads)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

sanitary napkin

n.
A disposable pad of absorbent material worn to absorb menstrual flow.

sanitary napkin

Kotex, sanitary pad Gynecology An absorbent pad worn externally to soak up menstrual flow

san·i·tar·y nap·kin

(san'i-tar-ē nap'kin)
Pad worn to absorb menstrual discharge.
References in periodicals archive ?
Each disposable pad has single use plastic in them, so just imagine the damage it is doing to the environment -- whether it ends up in landfills or in the ocean.
We found significant association between type of napkin/pads used and the age (P=0.001) of the participants, higher proportion of older girls used disposable pads than the young girls.
Shaw and Siemens estimate that one million disposable pads and tampons are now diverted from landfills every month thanks to women using their products.
Cloth is much drier than a disposable pad, so the occasional period-related yeast issues some women encounter can improve too.
It is estimated that hospitals switching from small sticky disposable pads to MEGADYNE's MEGA 2000 Soft have saved more than 1.8 million pounds of medical waste and nearly $1 million in disposal costs, based on $.50 per pound disposal fee, since the introduction of the MEGA 2000 System just five years ago.
Use disposable pads for eye make-up and wash and sterilise your brushes regularly.
Ultra-absorbent disposable pads give dogs a place to eliminate inside while protecting floors and carpet.
A current study is addressing small disposable pads for lightly incontinent women.
The disposable pads contain activated carbon and iron pellets that oxidize rapidly to give off heat; they provide heat for 8 hours at a relatively constant temperature of 38.9[degrees] C.
You can combine systems with reusable pants and disposable pads. Many children are eager to have "regular underwear" like their friends have.
The FactMR study opines that disposable pads and liners will represent ~33% demand share in 2019, however, currently high in demand incontinence products for females are likely to be overtaken by products for males through 2029.
Many women have since sought alternatives to the disposable pads to avoid wearing the possibly chemical-contaminated ones for a long period of time.