disinfectant

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Related to Disinfectants: Antiseptics

disinfectant

 [dis″in-fek´tant]
1. freeing from infection or infection-producing organisms.
2. an agent that does this. Heat and certain other physical agents such as live steam can be disinfectants, but in common usage the term is reserved for chemical substances such as mercury bichloride or phenol. Disinfectants are usually applied to inanimate objects since they are too strong to be used on living tissues. Chemical disinfectants are not always effective against spore-forming bacteria.

dis·in·fec·tant

(dis'in-fek'tănt),
1. Capable of destroying pathogenic microorganisms or inhibiting their growth activity.
2. An agent that possesses this property.

disinfectant

/dis·in·fec·tant/ (dis″-in-fek´tant)
1. freeing from infection.
2. an agent that disinfects, particularly one used on inanimate objects.

disinfectant

(dĭs′ĭn-fĕk′tənt)
n.
An agent, such as heat, radiation, or a chemical, that destroys, neutralizes, or inhibits the growth of disease-carrying microorganisms.
adj.
Serving to disinfect.

disinfectant

[dis′infek′tənt]
a liquid chemical that can be applied to objects to eliminate many or all pathogenic microorganisms with the exception of bacterial spores. See also antiseptic.

dis·in·fec·tant

(dis-in-fek'tănt)
1. Capable of destroying pathogenic microorganisms or inhibiting their growth.
2. An agent that possesses the capacity to disinfect.

disinfectant

a chemical agent used for the DISINFECTION of inanimate objects.

disinfectant

agent that destroys microorganisms

antiseptic 

An agent that kills or prevents the growth of bacteria. This term is generally restricted to agents that are sufficiently non-toxic for superficial application to living tissues. These include the preservatives for eye drops and contact lens solutions. Examples of antiseptics are alcohol, benzalkonium chloride, cetrimide, chlorbutanol, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide, thimerosal (or thiomersalate). Other agents that are too toxic to be applied to living tissues are called disinfectants and are used to sterilize instruments and apparatus. See disinfection; ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid; neutralization; sterilization.

dis·in·fec·tant

(dis-in-fek'tănt)
Agent capable of destroying pathogenic microorganisms or inhibiting their growth activity.

disinfectant (dis´infek´tənt),

n a chemical intended to destroy most pathogenic microorganisms. Does not cause sterilization.
disinfectant, alcohol,
n an unaccepted method of sterilization. Although ethanol and isopropanol both have cleansing properties when used on the skin, they are insufficient as sterilizers.
disinfectant, chlorine dioxide,
n a chemical disinfectant that can be used for 24 hours once it is activated. It can corrode some steel tools.
disinfectant holding solution,
n an antimicrobial liquid into which an object can be temporarily placed while awaiting sterilization.

disinfectant

1. freeing from infection.
2. an agent that destroys infection-producing organisms. Heat and certain other physical agents such as live steam can be disinfectants, but in common usage the term is reserved for chemical substances such as mercury bichloride or phenol. Disinfectants are usually applied to inanimate objects since they are too strong to be used on living tissues. Chemical disinfectants are not always effective against spore-forming bacteria.
References in periodicals archive ?
All four disinfectants used in the study were 100% effective on Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus.
Per the USP General Chapter <1072> Disinfectants, the test system is inoculated with sufficient inoculum to demonstrate at least a two log10 reduction for bacterial spores and a three log10 reduction for vegetative bacteria and allowed to dry.
Surface disinfectants must be used on clean surfaces to achieve adequate disinfection with the spray-wipe-spray method.
US demand for disinfectant and antimicrobial chemicals is projected to increase 5.
The researchers found that adolescents, with 307 episodes of illness, were more than four times as likely as adults to be injured or made ill by workplace exposure to disinfectants.
Exposure of a mixed microbial population to disinfectants results in selection of a disinfectant-resistant or tolerant population (38).
However, there have been major developments within the European Standards Organisation (CEN) that have resulted in new disinfectant test methods being published by the British Standards Institute.
Herman, the EPA's assistant administrator in the Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance, said that a primary focus of his Toxics and Pesticides Enforcement Division would be "continued efforts to remove from the marketplace ineffective and/or unregistered disinfectants used in hospitals and other critical care facilities.
Use mop or towels soaked with disinfectant for cleaning.
As do all disinfectants, free chlorine will produce by-products, the most notable being trihalomethanes or THMs.
The United States constituted approximately 41% of the total antiseptics and disinfectants market in 2010 and was around $1.
Key words: adolescence, disinfectants, halogens, hypochlorite, incidence, occupational diseases, phenols, poisoning, risk, youth.