disinfectant

(redirected from Disinfectants)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Disinfectants: Antiseptics

disinfectant

 [dis″in-fek´tant]
1. freeing from infection or infection-producing organisms.
2. an agent that does this. Heat and certain other physical agents such as live steam can be disinfectants, but in common usage the term is reserved for chemical substances such as mercury bichloride or phenol. Disinfectants are usually applied to inanimate objects since they are too strong to be used on living tissues. Chemical disinfectants are not always effective against spore-forming bacteria.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dis·in·fec·tant

(dis'in-fek'tănt),
1. Capable of destroying pathogenic microorganisms or inhibiting their growth activity.
2. An agent that possesses this property.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

disinfectant

(dĭs′ĭn-fĕk′tənt)
n.
An agent, such as heat, radiation, or a chemical, that destroys, neutralizes, or inhibits the growth of disease-carrying microorganisms.
adj.
Serving to disinfect.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

dis·in·fec·tant

(dis-in-fek'tănt)
1. Capable of destroying pathogenic microorganisms or inhibiting their growth.
2. An agent that possesses the capacity to disinfect.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

disinfectant

a chemical agent used for the DISINFECTION of inanimate objects.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

antiseptic 

An agent that kills or prevents the growth of bacteria. This term is generally restricted to agents that are sufficiently non-toxic for superficial application to living tissues. These include the preservatives for eye drops and contact lens solutions. Examples of antiseptics are alcohol, benzalkonium chloride, cetrimide, chlorbutanol, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide, thimerosal (or thiomersalate). Other agents that are too toxic to be applied to living tissues are called disinfectants and are used to sterilize instruments and apparatus. See disinfection; ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid; neutralization; sterilization.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

dis·in·fec·tant

(dis-in-fek'tănt)
Agent capable of destroying pathogenic microorganisms or inhibiting their growth activity.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
* Complying with the Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts rule: Supplement A--One of the Simple tools for Effective Performance (STEP) Guide Series for Small Systems Adding Any Chemical Disinfectant The Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (Stage 1 DBPR) applies to water systems that add a chemical disinfectant such as chlorine, chloramines, chlorine dioxide, or ozone to drinking water during any part of the treatment process.
The authors raise the need for better enforcement of existing health and safety regulations, especially those related to the appropriate use of personal protective equipment, and suggest revision of the Fair Labor Standards Act to include disinfectants as a hazard against which young workers must be protected.
The influence of the components of metalworking fluid or of chlorine or other disinfectants in water upon aerosolization mycobacteria is unknown.
Some water treatment plants have used chloramine as the primary disinfectant as far back as the 1920s.
The study covers the animal disinfectants market across various segments.
The battle against pathogenic infections includes the sterilisation of instruments, appropriate use of antibiotics and categorisation of hand sanitisers and environmental disinfectants. About 150 years ago, studies in Vienna by Dr.
They suggest that only bleach-based disinfectants can fight the concentration of these viruses.
Alternative disinfectants, such as chloramines, chlorine dioxide, and ozone, can also react with organics to form organic by-products.
Key words: adolescence, disinfectants, halogens, hypochlorite, incidence, occupational diseases, phenols, poisoning, risk, youth.
Agricultural disinfectants are noxious chemicals extensively used on crops and livestock to keep them safe against a range of microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, and virus.
Fact.MR has announced the addition of the "Salon Disinfectants Market Forecast, Trend Analysis & Competition Tracking - Global Market insights 2018 to 2028"report to their offering.