epidemiology

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epidemiology

 [ep″ĭ-de″me-ol´o-je]
the science concerned with the study of the factors determining and influencing the frequency and distribution of disease, injury, and other health-related events and their causes in a defined human population for the purpose of establishing programs to prevent and control their development and spread. Also, the sum of knowledge gained in such a study.
analytic epidemiology the second stage in an epidemiologic study, in which hypotheses generated in the descriptive phase are tested.
descriptive epidemiology the first stage in an epidemiologic study, in which a disease that has occurred is examined. Data necessary in this phase include time and place of occurrence and the characteristics of the persons affected. Tentative theories regarding the cause of the disease are advanced and a hypothesis is formulated.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ep·i·de·mi·ol·o·gy

(ep'i-dē'mē-ol'ŏ-jē),
The study of the distribution and determinants of health-related states or events in specified populations, and the application of this study to control of health problems.
[G. epidēmios, epidemic, + logos, study]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

epidemiology

(ĕp′ĭ-dē′mē-ŏl′ə-jē, -dĕm′ē-)
n.
The branch of medicine that deals with the study of the causes, distribution, and control of disease in populations.

ep′i·de′mi·o·log′ic (-ə-lŏj′ĭk), ep′i·de′mi·o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
ep′i·de′mi·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
ep′i·de′mi·ol′o·gist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

epidemiology

The formal study of health event patterns in a population, their causes and means of prevention. Epidemiology provides the scientific basis for evidence-based medicine and strategies to improve public health.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

epidemiology

1. The study of the distribution of disease and its impact upon a population, using such measures as incidence, prevalence, or mortality.
2. The study of the occurrence and causes of health effects in human populations.
3. The science of public health, which studies the frequency, distribution, and causes of diseases in a population–rather than in an individual, and examines the impact of social and physical factors in the environment on morbid conditions. See AIDS epidemiology, Analytical epidemiology, Cancer epidemiology, Clinical epidemiology, Developmental epidemiology, Intersecting epidemiology, Inverted epidemiology, Prospective epidemiology, Retrospective epidemiology.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ep·i·de·mi·ol·o·gy

(ep'i-dē'mē-ol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the distribution and determinants of health-related states or events in specified populations, and the application of this study to control of health problems.
[G. epidēmios, epidemic, + logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

epidemiology

The study of the occurrence, in populations, of the whole range of conditions that affect health. It includes the study of the attack rate of the various diseases (incidence) and the number of people suffering from each condition at any one time (prevalence). Industrial and environmental health problems are also an important aspect of epidemiology.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

epidemiology

the study of the incidence, distribution and control of an EPIDEMIC disease in a population.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

epidemiology

A branch of health science that deals with the incidence, prevalence, distribution and aetiology of disease in a population.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

ep·i·de·mi·ol·o·gy

(ep'i-dē'mē-ol'ŏ-jē)
Study of distribution and determinants of health-related states or events in specified populations and application of results to control health problems.
[G. epidēmios, epidemic, + logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on disease pattern, it is segmented into skin and hair, skeletal system, infectious diseases, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal track, nervous systems, respiratory system and others.
SPSS version 14 was used to calculate the frequency and percentage of various disease patterns.
In Pakistan, despite the advances in prophylactic therapy and diagnostics, Tuberculosis still is a major heath concern and is leading cause of intestinal obstruction in our setup.8 Moreover disease pattern not only varies from country to country but also from one geographical area to the other in the same country, reason being the different causal factors of different regions.
DISCUSSION: This study was conducted with the objective to study the disease pattern, outcome and factors contributing to mortality of the newborns admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of a tertiary care hospital.
We have not evaluated radiographic findings in our study as we wanted to study possible differences between disease patterns, but the findings of associations between S-calprotectin and moderate/high disease activity and more than three swollen joints are in line with our findings.
Increase in functional loss is associated with the disease pattern of the individual.
Health Secretary Stephen Dorrell tells a stunned Commons fresh investigations had identified a "previously unrecognised and consistent disease pattern".
In an associated report, the AMA Board of Trustees issued findings regarding "Multiple Drug Resistant Tuberculosis: A Multifaceted Problem," which reviewed preventive, diagnostic, and therapeutic recommendations on this critical new disease pattern. The significantly more communicable nature of TB has largely been overlooked in recent OSHA requirements and HIV focus.
Former Tamil Nadu CM Jayalalithaa was brought to hospital in a critical condition, showed significant progress later, but disease pattern was such and due to acute respiratory distress syndrome she passed away.
The disease pattern is the same which is seen at this camp which is being organized regularly for the last few years.
He strongly supported other speakers, including diabetologists, that current disease pattern in the country demanded promotion of a culture of healthy living among the people in general and the high risk groups as well as diabetics in particular.
'In the given situation we also need teams of scientists to keep vigil on the emerging disease pattern,' said Dr Mumtaz Hussain.

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