pathogen

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Related to Disease agent: communicable disease, Infectious diseases

pathogen

 [path´o-jen]
any disease-producing agent or microorganism. adj., adj pathogen´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

path·o·gen

(path'ō-jen),
Any virus, microorganism, or other substance causing disease.
[patho- + G. -gen, to produce]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pathogen

(păth′ə-jən)
n.
An agent that causes disease, especially a virus, bacterium, or fungus.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

pathogen

Any disease-producing microorganism.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

pathogen

Popularly, bug Any disease-producing microorganism. See Blood-borne pathogen, Emerging pathogen, Food-borne pathogen, Intracellular pathogen, Water-borne pathogen.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

path·o·gen

(path'ŏ-jĕn)
Any virus, microorganism, or other substance that causes disease.
[patho- + G. -gen, to produce]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

pathogen

Any agent that causes disease, especially a micro-organism.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

pathogen

or

pathogene

any organism that causes disease, such as a virus, bacterium or fungus.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Pathogen

Any disease-producing agent or microorganism.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

path·o·gen

(path'ŏ-jĕn)
Any virus, microorganism, or other substance causing disease.
[patho- + G. -gen, to produce]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Haemaphysalis longicornis is a tick indigenous to Asia, where it is an important vector of human and animal disease agents, which can result in human hemorrhagic fever and substantive reduction in dairy production.
In simplified terms, we may categorize disease agents according to their level of development of a cell-like structure.
* Herbaceous tests (3 to 6 months) where extracts from candidate plants are inoculated onto herbaceous plants which respond with the development of characteristic symptoms should the disease agent be present;
Of these disease agents a vaccine is only available for M.
Current policy is that persons or entities must apply for approval for use of even those drugs (antimicrobial and others) for which it has clearly been established that such use will not compromise their ability to control a particular disease agent in humans, veterinary medicine, or agriculture.
The program, called TranStat, was developed by a team of epidemiologists and computer scientists from the Models of Infectious Disease Agent Study (MIDAS), an international program supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to build computational models for studying disease spread.
"In addition, some sausages are contained in natural sheep casings made from sheep intestines which are more likely to carry the disease agent and therefore could present a greater risk."
Biological factors come into play when the disease agent is in the animal's body or when the animal's body produces chemicals that interfere with the drug action on the disease agent.
Plants can be infected for up to several years before showing symptoms, and during this period the psyllid can transmit the disease agent to nearby plants.
The disease agent is not us, but something else, an "Other." Even so, we may harbor it within our bodies and unintentionally spread it by our conduct.
burgdorferi-infected nymphs differs between different woodland types; oak woodlands show a greater risk for exposure to the Lyme disease agent than redwood habitats (6,7).
Infectious diseases are grouped by disease agent, rather than body system.