dissociative identity disorder

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dissociative identity disorder

 
a type of dissociative disorder in which more than one personality exists in the same individual. Each personality has unique memories, characteristic behaviors, and social relationships that determine the individual's actions when that personality is dominant; the various personalities are usually very different from one another and may even seem to be opposites. At least two of the personalities control the patient's behavior in turns, with the transition from one personality to another often being abrupt. The host personality is usually totally unaware of the alternate personalities and experiences only gaps of time when the others are in control as well as inability to recall important personal information. Called also multiple personality disorder

dissociative identity disorder

1. a disorder in which two or more distinct conscious personalities alternately prevail in the same person, sometimes without any one personality being aware of the other(s).
2. a DSM diagnosis that is established when the specified criteria are met.

dissociative identity disorder

dissociative identity disorder

a psychiatric disorder characterized by the existence of two or more distinct, clearly differentiated personality structures within the same individual, any of which may dominate at a particular time. Each personality is a complex unit with separate well-developed emotional and thought processes, behavior patterns, and social relationships. The various subpersonalities are usually dramatically different and may or may not be aware of the existence of the others. Formerly called multiple personality disorder.

dissociative identity disorder

Multiple personality disorder The “presence of 2 or more distinct identities or personality states…that recurrently take control of behavior.” DID is accompanied by an inability to recall important personal information that exceeds ordinary forgetfulness; there are ±20,000 DIDs in the US

dis·so·ci·a·tive i·den·ti·ty dis·or·der

(di-sō'sē-ă-tiv ī-den'ti-tē dis-ōr'dĕr)
A disorder in which two or more distinct conscious personalities alternately prevail in the same person, sometimes without any one personality being aware of the other(s).

Dissociative identity disorder (DID)

Term that replaced Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD). A condition in which two or more distinctive identities or personality states alternate in controlling a person's consciousness and behavior.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, "Patriot Acts" showcases another contemporary confusion: to mistake the humanist, psyche-friendly play of the associative mode for the withholding defiance of the disassociative mode.
Types of ontological pathology, and possible associative relationships between type combinations Pathology Type Nature 1 (11 and 12) Can result in disassociative behaviour that has little reference to ideate images (or the subconscious).
Moving from a Disassociative to Relationally Active to Functionally Active is about effects, participation, and relationships.
This is related to how the socialization process may produce associative and disassociative interactions or relationships.
You never know when disassociative thinking may produce an inspiration.
Guilt, it turns out, is a disassociative emotion that serves as a gateway to remorse, but guilt alone fails to catalyze character transformation.
19) During a fugue state or disassociative fugue a person will undertake sudden unexpected travel away from his home or customary place of daily activities and be unable to recall some or all of his past.
Without a disassociative component, a claim of temporary insanity would be incoherent.
Dissociation: Progress in the Disassociative Disorders, 5, 111-116.
During or after experiencing the distressing event, the individual has three or more of the following: (a) a subjective sense of numbing or detachment; (b) reduction in the awareness of surroundings; (c) derealization; (d) depersonalization; (e) disassociative amnesia;
He was diagnosed as suffering from "adjustment disorder with disassociative reaction" and "severe" stress.
they are immediately followed by disassociative references to the same parties (".