disability-free life expectancy


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disability-free life expectancy

(dis-ă-bil'i-tē frē līf eks-pek'tăn-sē),
the average number of years a person is expected to live without disability if current patterns of mortality and disability continue to apply.
References in periodicals archive ?
[DFLE.sub.x] is disability-free life expectancy, which comprises the average number of disability-free years expected to be lived from age x.
Tables 1 and 2 display estimates of total life expectancy (TLE), disability-free life expectancy (DFLE), and disability life expectancy (DLE) in 1998 and 2013 by age group, Major Region, and sex in both absolute and relative terms.
It is important to note that the difference in total life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy at age 60 between male and female increased by approximately one year.
Using point and interval estimates of the prevalence of disability and the mortality tables produced by the IBGE, we calculated disability-free life expectancy incorporating the uncertainties raised by the prevalence of disability shown in Figure 1.
Figure 3 shows the differences in total life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy at age 60 between men and women in absolute terms (DFLE) and relative terms (DFLE %).
In all regions except the North, the differences between both total life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy increased between 1998 and 2013.
Therefore, disability-free life expectancy among male and female should be analyzed in relation to total life expectancy and not just in absolute terms, which is the reason why the results of this analysis are included in Figure 3.
Therefore, the present study estimated disability-free life expectancy at age 60 among men and women in 1998 and 2013 for Brazil and Major Regions.
The aim of the present study was to determine whether the elimination of certain chronic diseases is capable of leading to the compression of morbidity among elderly individuals, in the city of Sao Paulo (Brazil), through an analysis of changes in life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy.
The results demonstrate that the elimination of chronic diseases would lead to gains in disability-free life expectancy between the ages of 60 and 74 years and at 75 years of age or older.
Greater gains in disability-free life expectancy would occur in the female gender due to absolute and relative compression of morbidity.
The disparity between the healthy life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy figures arises because, while some people may have a chronic illness or a disability, they may still consider their general health to be good.
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