direct-to-consumer advertising


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direct-to-consumer advertising

Drug industry The use of mass media–eg, TV, magazines, newspapers, to publicly promote drugs, medical devices or other products which, by law, require a prescription, which targets consumers, with the intent of having a Pt request the product by name. See Advertising. Cf 'Yellow' professionalism.

direct-to-consumer advertising

(dĭ-rĕkt′ too kŏn-soo′mĕr ăd′vĕr-tī″zĭng)
The marketing and sales of drugs, diagnostic or therapeutic services, and other medically related products or services by their owner or manufacturer to the general public by means of television, radio, the Internet, and direct mail. The most commonly advertised drugs are medications for allergies, arthritis, depression, erectile dysfunction, gastroesophageal reflux, and high blood pressure.
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Controlling direct-to-consumer advertising, professional promotion and the price of pharmaceutical drugs.
The impact of direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs on physician visits and drug requests: Empirical findings and public policy implications.
A decade of direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs.
(2006) GAO-07-54 Prescription Drugs: Improvements Needed in FDA's Oversight of Direct-to-Consumer Advertising. U.S.
(5) It found that total spending on pharmaceutical advertising grew from $11.4 billion in 1996 to $29.9 billion in 2005 and direct-to-consumer advertising alone increased 330%.
Physicians report on patient encounters involving direct-to-consumer advertising. Health Aff (Millwood).
They said industry analysts suggest that because direct-to-consumer advertising increases sales, it allows companies to spread out their costs, making them more affordable for everyone.
Examples of subjects tackled by the volumes include alien abductions, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, chaos theory, drugs and direct-to-consumer advertising, the Gaia hypothesis, genetically modified organisms, green building design, information technology, intellectual property, medical marijuana, parapsychology, quarks, reproductive technology, research ethics, the scientific method, urban warfare, virtual reality, waste management, and wind energy.
Direct-to-Consumer Advertising of Medical Devices Under Scrutiny: November 5, 2008, JAMA questioned whether the public can truly comprehend, based on 60 second television commercials, ad pages in newspapers and popular magazines, or internet pages, the benefit and risks of such device-based medical interventions as total hip replacement or the use of stents in a percutaneous coronary intervention.
Direct-to-consumer advertising may have a limited effect on demand for medication, based on analysis of Canadians exposed to U.S.
This statement is based on GAO's 2006 report, Prescription Drugs: Improvements Needed in FDA's Oversight of Direct-to-Consumer Advertising, GAO-07-54 (November 16, 2006).
Currently, the United States and New Zealand are the only two industrialized countries that allow direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) for prescription drugs, and the investigation has spurred discussion over marketing in the pharmaceutical industry, which recorded nearly $650 billion in sales in 2006, according to IMS Health, Inc.