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current

 [kur´ent]
1. something that flows.
2. specifically, electricity transmitted through a circuit.
alternating current a current that periodically flows in opposite directions; its amplitude fluctuates as a sine wave.
convection current a current caused by movement by convection of warmer fluid into an area of cooler fluid.
direct current a current that flows in one direction only; when modeled as a wave, its amplitude is constant. When used medically it is called galvanic current. This current has distinct and important polarity and marked secondary chemical effects.
galvanic current a steady direct current.
current of injury an electric current that flows between injured myocardium and normal myocardium, because such cells have a reduced membrane potential; it may be either diastolic or systolic.
current of injury, diastolic the current that flows from injured to noninjured tissue during electrical diastole.
current of injury, systolic the current that flows from healthy tissue to injured tissue during electrical systole.
inwardly rectifying current current that rectifies so that it passes more easily towards the interior of a cell.
leakage current the electrical current that exists in the parts or metal case of electrical equipment.
outwardly rectifying current current that rectifies so that it passes more easily towards the exterior of a cell.
potassium rectifying c's transmembrane currents that rectify inwardly or outwardly to make adjustments in cellular functions; they are mainly responsible for the repolarization phase of the action potential. There are at least six mechanisms by which potassium ions move across cardiac cell membranes in the role of rectifier.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

di·rect cur·rent (DC),

a current that flows only in one direction, for example, that is derived from a battery; sometimes referred to as galvanic current.
See also: galvanism.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

direct current

A continuous electromagnetic current that flows in only one direction.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

di·rect cur·rent

(DC) (di-rekt kŭrĕnt)
An electrical current that flows only in one direction; e.g., that derived from a battery; sometimes referred to as galvanic current.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

di·rect cur·rent

(DC) (di-rekt kŭrĕnt)
An electrical current that flows only in one direction; also referred to as galvanic current.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
With direct-current lines, grid operators have more options for energy sources throughout the day, allowing them to tap into, say, cheap wind two states away during times of peak demand instead of turning to nearby but more expensive natural-gas plants for a few hours.
Consequently, environmentally conscious direct-current distribution systems that combine renewable energy and electrical accumulators are gaining popularity.
Thanks to high-voltage direct-current (HVDC) transmission technology, the new system's transmission losses, including cable losses, are just three percent.
Fridriksson, "Individualized model predicts brain current flow during transcranial direct-current stimulation treatment in responsive stroke patient," Brain Stimulation, vol.
Drive rollers utilize precision 24-volt, direct-current brushless motors.
The newer computerized models, with their disposable electrodes, allow for trouble-free, direct-current (DC) operation.
As a test, the researchers chemically induced spikes in the rat tissue to mimic those preceding a seizure and then exposed the neurons to a steady, direct-current field.
"Direct-current locomotives are likely to remain the dominant technology for some time because railroads have made substantial investments in them," said Jim Sabourin, a spokesman for Burlington Northern.
Switched-reluctance and permanent magnet brushless machines are now more popular than direct-current brush machines, he says, but are rarely included in introductory textbooks.
Eastern Bavarian Technical University Regensburg, Berlin Technical University and Dresden University of Applied Sciences, among others, are working under the lead management of Siemens on developing a new gas-insulated DC transmission line known as the DC CTL (Compact Transmission Line for Direct-Current High Voltage) for laying underground.

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